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Kintarō rigyo o toru 金太郎捕鯉魚 (Kintarō Captures the Carp)

  • Object type

  • Museum number

    2012,3005.1

  • Title (object)

    • Kintarō rigyo o toru 金太郎捕鯉魚 (Kintarō Captures the Carp)
  • Description

    Colour woodblock print, vertical diptych. Strong boy Kintaro (also called Kaidomaru) wrestling a giant carp at the base of a waterfall. Clear glue applied to the eyes to give them lustre (original to the print). Two sheets pasted together.

  • Producer name

  • School/style

  • Culture/period

  • Date

    • July 1885
  • Production place

  • Materials

  • Technique

  • Dimensions

    • Height: 37.7 centimetres (top sheet)
    • Width: 25.7 centimetres (top sheet)
    • Height: 39.1 centimetres (bottom sheet)
    • Width: 26.1 centimetres (bottom sheet)
    • Height: 73.9 centimetres (overall)
    • Width: 26.4 centimetres (overall)
  • Inscriptions

      • Inscription Type

        inscription
      • Inscription Transliteration

        Ōju Yoshitoshi ga
      • Inscription Translation

        Drawn by Yoshitoshi, to special request
      • Inscription Type

        seal
      • Inscription Transliteration

        Yoshitoshi
      • Inscription Translation

        Yoshitoshi
      • Inscription Comment

        Printed
      • Inscription Type

        seal impression
      • Inscription Transliteration

        Kiyokata
      • Inscription Translation

        Kiyokata
      • Inscription Comment

        Collector's seal
  • Curator's comments

    Kintaro was a childhood name of the warrior hero Sakata no Kintoki. He was a strong boy raised in the wild by a mountain woman called Yamauba. The episode of him struggling with a giant carp has currently been traced only as far back as the 1820s. See the commentary to the print of the same subject by Kuniyoshi (where the boy is named Sakata Kaidōmaru) in Timothy Clark, Kuniyoshi, from the Arthur R. Miller Collection, London, RA Publications, 2009, no. 18. This is an early and very fine impression of a striking design considered among the most important of Yoshitoshi’s whole oeuvre. This print was formerly in the collection of Nihonga artist Kaburaki Kiyokata (q.v.) (T. Clark, 2/2012)

    Machida Shiritsu Kokusai Manga Bijutsukan, ed. Dai musha-e ten (2003), no. 257
    See Roger Keyes, Courage and Silence (1982), no. 473; Chris Uhlenbeck & Amy Reigle Newland, Yoshitoshi: Masterpieces from the Ed Fries Collection (Hotei Publishing, 2011), no. 86.

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  • Exhibition history

    2012 Feb – Jun, BM Japanese Galleries, ‘Japan, from Prehistory to the Present’

  • Subjects

  • Associated names

  • Acquisition name

  • Acquisition date

    2012

  • Acquisition notes

    Credit Line: Purchase funded by JTI Japanese Acquisition Fund

  • Department

    Asia

  • Registration number

    2012,3005.1

Colour woodblock print, vertical diptych. Strong boy Kintaro (also called Kaidomaru) wrestling a giant carp at the base of a waterfall. Clear glue applied to the eyes to give them lustre (original to the print). Two sheets pasted together.

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Object reference number: JCF22966

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