Collection online

coat

  • Object type

  • Museum number

    2010,8038.1

  • Description

    Man's sheepskin coat, decorated with hand sewn cut leather appliqué stained deep red and pale cream, and coloured embroidery in red, green, purple, blue and pink wools. Two slits enable pockets in inner clothing to be reached, and behind them at the back are two padded leather flaps. The coat fastens with leather buttons and loops.

    More 

  • Ethnic name

  • Date

    • 1880-1920
  • Production place

  • Materials

  • Technique

  • Dimensions

    • Height: 125 centimetres
    • Width: 59 centimetres (under arms)
  • Curator's comments

    Made for Saxon Germans living in Transylvania, now part of Romania, formerly part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. The Transylvanian Saxons settled in the Transylvanian region of Hungary (German: Siebenbürgen) in the Middle Ages. When Transylvania became part of Romania in 1918 the Saxons became part of a German-speaking minority in Romania.

    This man's coat was traditionally worn specifically for going to church, hence its German name: Kirchenpelz (see Beate Wild, 'Fur within, Flowers without: a Transylvanian fur coat worn to church', in E. Tietmeyer and I. Ziehe (eds), 'Europa Entdecken ! Discover Europe !', exhibition catalogue, Museum Europäischer Kulturen, Berlin 2008, pp. 26-34). It was made in the Tarnavelor region of Transylvania, an area known for its furriers workshops in the late 19th century. Most towns had such workshops but the most famous were at Slimnic and Rusi. In the twentieth century the appliqué work began to be done by machine with thread purchased at fairs, but the appliqué on this coat is hand sewn (information kindly supplied by Nicoleta Sirbu, Museum of the Romanian Peasant, Bucharest).

    A closely similar coat is held by the Textile Museum of Canada, given by Kalman Czeglédy and made for the donor's grandmother, Mrs Justina Fejes Czeglédy, in 1903. The embroidered motifs and leather appliqué work are almost identical, except for areas of whiter background in place of the larger applied leather motifs on the front and back, but it is not clear whether the leather is missing or was never applied. See: https://www.textilemuseum.ca/apps/index.cfm?page=collection.detail&catId=7359&row=1
    For another coat of this type dated 1873 in the Siebenbürgisches Museum, Gundelsheim, Germany, see
    http://www.siebenbuergisches-museum.de/sammlung/kleidung-und-wohnkultur/kleidung/kirchenpelz.html

    For a similar man's coat ('cojoc') from the Banat area of Transylvania, see G. Oprescu, 'L’Art du Paysan Roumain', Bucarest 1937, pl. XC. Oprescu notes that these coats were both bad weather and festive garments: when it rained they were worn inside out with the fur outside. See also M. Orend, 'Deutsche Volkskunst: Siebenbürgen', Hermannstadt 1942, pl. 85, for a group of men from Rode (Zagăr) wearing very similar coats, together with large fur hats. For waistcoat worn by Transylvanian Saxons, see 2012,8015.28.The Kirchenpelz was worn by both men and women to church or church-related occasions, including events held outside the physical space of worship. Some communities imposed the use of the Kirchenpelz all year round, while others would replace it with lighter garments during summer. It was normally given during the special occasion of one’s confirmation or wedding at the latest, and if there were insufficient means to acquire a new coat, a used version was usually donated by a member of the extended family. In this case, the furrier would rework the garment by whitening the skin and fixing the trimmings.

    When wearing a Kirchenpelz, both one’s faith in the Protestant Church and affiliation with the Transylvanian Saxon community were clearly expressed. Strict codes of behaviour, applied to the environment of the church, also permeated other areas of communal life. For instance, as long as the coat was worn, one was forbidden, amongst other things, to drink and smoke.

    Unlike other forms of traditional peasant dress, the Kirchenpelz managed to retain its use until the very recent past. Even after they had exchanged their traditional garments for urban Western clothes, men still wore Kirchenpelz coats on church occasions, if not as an obligatory element of out-dated church garb, certainly as reminders of the past. Today, these coats are worn as traditional folk costume during Heimattag processions in Dinkelsbühl, Bavaria or during the Munich Oktoberfest. Away from their original roles as church garb of everyday life, they now symbolise one’s ancestry linked to a Transylvanian identity.

    Reference: Coraca, I. 2016. Vested in Identity: Ethnic dress and collective identity in Transylvania. Thesis (MA), University College London.

    More 

  • Location

    Not on display

  • Acquisition name

  • Acquisition date

    2010

  • Department

    Britain, Europe and Prehistory

  • Registration number

    2010,8038.1

Sheepskin coat, decorated with hand sewn cut leather appliqué stained deep red and pale cream, and coloured embroidery in red, green, purple, blue and pink wools. Two slits enable pockets in inner clothing to be reached, and behind them at the back are two padded leather flaps. The coat fastens with leather buttons and loops.

Sheepskin coat, decorated with hand sewn cut leather appliqué stained deep red and pale cream, and coloured embroidery in red, green, purple, blue and pink wools. Two slits enable pockets in inner clothing to be reached, and behind them at the back are two padded leather flaps. The coat fastens with leather buttons and loops.

Image description

Recommend


Feedback

If you’ve noticed a mistake or have any further information about this object, please email: collectiondatabase@britishmuseum.org 

View open data for this object with SPARQL endpoint

Object reference number: EEU118518

British Museum collection data is also available in the W3C open data standard, RDF, allowing it to join and relate to a growing body of linked data published by organisations around the world.

View this object

Support the Museum:
donate online

The Museum makes its collection database available to be used by scholars around the world. Donations will help support curatorial, documentation and digitisation projects.

About the database

The British Museum collection database is a work in progress. New records, updates and images are added every week.

More about the database 

Supporters

Work on this database is supported by a range of sponsors, donors and volunteers.

More about supporters and how you
can help  

Loading...