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head-dress-ornament / head-band

  • Object type

  • Museum number

    2009,6023.186-187

  • Description

    A pair of silver head-bands or head-chains (mishill, literally 'support') used to support heavy ear-rings or ear pendants (ghalamiyyah). Each head-chain is made of six strands of box-chains (three on each side, which are connected in the centre by a fastener made of three soldered figure-of-eight loops). On one end of the head-chain is a large silver hoop, used to suspend an ear-ring, and a tear-drop shaped pendant acts as a decorative counterweight on the other end. The tear-drop is decorated with beaded wire. Worn by Bedouin women in Northern and Central Oman.

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  • Ethnic name

  • Date

    • 1950s
  • Production place

  • Findspot

  • Materials

  • Technique

  • Dimensions

    • Weight: 46 grammes (2009,6023.186)
    • Length: 35.5 centimetres (2006,6023.186)
    • Weight: 43 grammes (2009,6023.187)
    • Length: 37.5 centimetres (2009,6023.187)
  • Curator's comments

    For similar examples see: Ruth Hawley, 'Silver: The Traditional Art of Oman' (London, 2000); Jehan S. Rajab, 'Silver Jewellery of Oman' (Kuwait, 1997); Neil Richardson and Marcia Dorr, 'The Craft Heritage of Oman' (Dubai, 2003); Miranda Morris and Pauline Shelton, 'Oman Adorned: A Portrait in Silver' (Muscat, 1997).

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  • Location

    Not on display

  • Condition

    Fair

  • Conservation

    See treatments 

    Treatment date

    13 September 2010

    Reason for treatment

    Temporary Exhibition

    Treatment proposal

    repair and light cleaning

    Condition

    The surface appears to develop a slight tarnish (yellow). One repair is located at the center of the belt and disrupts the view of the object.

    Treatment details

    The tarnished surface was lightly removed with White Spirit (composition variable - petroleum distillate) on cotton swabs. The white wire was removed by deforming it. The link was cut with a saw chains and was inserted by using pliers covered by tape on the shape parts.

    About these records 

  • Acquisition name

  • Acquisition date

    2009

  • Acquisition notes

    This object is part of a collection of 20th century silver items (2009,6023.1 ff.) acquired in Oman between 1987-1995. This collection was mainly acquired in the markets of Nizwa, Mutrah and Rustaq and a small number of pieces were acquired in Sur, Wadi Bani Ouf, Bahla, Ibra and Ibri.

  • Department

    Middle East

  • Registration number

    2009,6023.186-187

A pair of silver head-bands or head-chains used to support heavy ear-rings or ear pendants (ghalamiyyah). Each head-chain is made of six strands of box-chains (three on each side, which are connected in the centre by a fastener made of three soldered figu

A pair of silver head-bands or head-chains used to support heavy ear-rings or ear pendants (ghalamiyyah). Each head-chain is made of six strands of box-chains (three on each side, which are connected in the centre by a fastener made of three soldered figu

Image description

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Object reference number: RRM41582

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