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bowl

  • Object type

  • Museum number

    PDF,A.647

  • Description

    Porcelain bowl. Underglaze blue with wide band of scrolling flowers and leaves above a band of overlapping petals. Wide band of scrolling flowers and leaves on inside, including peony and camellia. Roundel with single chrysanthemum in centre. There is an inscription on the base.

  • Culture/period

  • Date

    • 1465-1487
  • Production place

  • Materials

  • Technique

  • Dimensions

    • Height: 70 millimetres
    • Diameter: 153 millimetres
  • Inscriptions

      • Inscription Type

        mark
      • Inscription Language

        Chinese
      • Inscription Comment

        Six-character Chenghua mark in a double circle in underglaze blue on the base
  • Curator's comments

    Published PDF date : Ming ChenghuaRoom 95 label text:

    PDF A647

    ‘Palace’ bowl with flowers of the four seasons


    Porcelain decorators at the imperial kilns painted the cobalt blue motifs in smooth washes of varying thickness, creating scrolling flower and leaf designs. The cobalt is finely pulverised and evenly applied, in contrast to the fourteenth and early fifteenth century when unevenly ground cobalt fired black in some areas and pale blue in others. This bowl shows gardenia scrolls outside and inside is a composite flower scroll of the four seasonal flowers.


    Porcelain with underglaze cobalt-blue decoration
    Jingdezhen, Jiangxi province江西省, 景德鎮
    Ming dynasty, Chenghua mark and period, AD1465–87

    More 

  • Bibliography

    • Medley 1975 Monochrome pl. 108 bibliographic details
    • Medley 1976 p.43, no.A647 bibliographic details
    • Pierson 2004 p.62, no.A647, front cover (reign mark, p.115) bibliographic details
    • Krahl & Harrison-Hall 2009 pp 72-73, no.36 bibliographic details
  • Location

    G95/case57-1

  • Conservation

    See treatments 

    Treatment date

    10 March 2009

    Reason for treatment

    Permanent Exhibition

    Treatment proposal

    Redo chip.

    Condition

    The object has an old restoration fill (approx. 2cm x 0.2cm) along the rim that has yellowed. A crack runs from this filled area and is visible on the exterior and interior surfaces. The length of the crack is approx. 3cm and the segment closest to the fill has also yellowed.

    The bowl has an unglazed ring base that bears some in-grained surface dirt.

    Treatment details

    Removal of the old fill:

    Acetone, IMS, and deionised water did not dissolve the old fill material, however, acetone and IMS helped the fill delaminate from the object surface. The old fill extended beyond the limits of the void and covered some of the object. Under UV, the fill material fluoresced greenish yellow and it is likely an epoxy resin. UV light also confirmed the crack was consolidated with the epoxy resin.

    The old fill was removed by a combination of chemical and mechanical means. Nitromors® (dichloromethane-containing paint stripper) was applied directly to the old fill and the area was covered with aluminum foil and cling film for twenty minutes. The Nitromors® softened the expoxy resin enough to mechanically remove it using a scalpel. However, evaporation of the solvent led to re-hardening of the resin and so three applications of Nitromors® was used before all of it was removed. After each application of Nitromors®, the paint stripper was wiped off with a tissue and worked with a scalpel followed by repeatedly wiping with deionised water-soaked cotton wads. Once the fill was completely removed from the rim, the area was further rinsed with warm tap water and left under cover to passively dry out over the course of a week without ingress of dust and dirt. The use of Nitromors® to remove the old fill also lightened the yellowness in the crack near the rim. Based on the results of the percussive method, the crack was not destabilised.

    For the new fill, Fynebond epoxy resin was used bulked with fumed silica and microballoons for a slightly opaque core. The translucent surface was achieved by bulking with only fumed silica. The bulked resin paste was applied using a metal spatula and allowed to partially cure overnight. At this point, the resin was shaved back and shaped using a scalpel and further translucent resin was applied. This was then allowed to partially cure again overnight. Small color fills using cobalt blue dry pigments mixed in the fumed silica-bulked Fynebond were applied in small gaps made by the scalpel to correspond with the blue bands in the decoration. This was then allowed to fully cure for 2 days. After which the area was polished with Micromesh fine abrasive cloths (silicon carbide/aluminium oxide) in grades 1500, 2000, 4000, 6000, 8000, and 12000.

    About these records 

  • Acquisition name

  • Department

    Asia

  • Registration number

    PDF,A.647

Porcelain bowl. Underglaze blue with wide band of scrolling flowers and leaves above a band of overlapping petals. Wide band of scrolling flowers and leaves on inside, including peony and camellia. Roundel with single chrysanthemum in centre. Inscription on base.

Porcelain bowl. Underglaze blue with wide band of scrolling flowers and leaves above a band of overlapping petals. Wide band of scrolling flowers and leaves on inside, including peony and camellia. Roundel with single chrysanthemum in centre. Inscription on base.

Image description

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Object reference number: RRC39553

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