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To celebrate Vikings Live, we have replaced our Roman alphabet with the runic alphabet used by the Vikings, the Scandinavian ‘Younger Futhark’. The ‘Younger Futhark’ has only 16 letters, so we have used some of the runic letters more than once or combined two runes for one Roman letter.

For an excellent introduction to runes, we recommend Martin Findell’s book published by British Museum Press.

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token

  • Object type

  • Museum number

    1856,0701.5432

  • Description

    Token; lead; obverse: crowned letter with border of small circles; reverse: no trace of border, but central cross patée between four large dots.

  • Findspot

  • Materials

  • Dimensions

    • Diameter: 2.3 centimetres
  • Inscriptions

      • Inscription Type

        inscription
      • Inscription Script

        Lombardic
      • Inscription Position

        obverse
      • Inscription Content

        M
  • Conservation

    See treatments 

    Treatment date

    23 March 2011

    Reason for treatment

    Storage

    Treatment proposal

    Stabilize chemically and physically. Clean, repair and support as necessary

    Condition

    These objects were previously treated via consolidative electrolytic reduction (CER) as part of Treatments 5 and 6 in this event. They were separated from the other seals in Treatment 6 at the start of reduction in week 5 (22 -26 June 2009) prior to the copper contamination incident. At this point, the seals appeared to be furthest along in being reduced with only a few localised patches of white corrosion visible on the surfaces and so they were removed from the bath reduction process to undergo localised reduction.

    Treatment details

    Localised electrolytic reduction was applied to the objects using 10% sulfuric acid in deionised water as the electrolyte.

    The treatment was only partially completed. When not treating, the objects were placed into a bath of tap water. After a week, a white surface bloom formed on the object surfaces. These objects were then taken out of the water bath and solvent dried in an acetone bath.

    About these records 

  • Subjects

  • Acquisition name

  • Acquisition date

    1856

  • Department

    Britain, Europe and Prehistory

  • Registration number

    1856,0701.5432


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Object reference number: MCN11608

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