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The loyal married ladies address to the ****

  • Object type

  • Museum number

    1935,0522.12.135

  • Title (object)

    • The loyal married ladies address to the ****
  • Description

    George IV sits on the throne, surrounded by kneeling women; he takes the hand of Lady Conyngham, who proffers their address: "Loyal Address of the Married Ladies." She says: "We the humble and Loyal Married Ladies feel ourselves bound in due veneration to your most sacred person to present to you our sincere thanks for the many tokens of Love we the Loyal Married Ladies have laid under and we humbly acknowledge the favours our Husbands as [sic] experienced through the medium of us the Loyal Married Ladies!!!—" Behind her, a second lady, resembling Lady Hertford, looks startled. With them is a third, perhaps Mrs. Quentin. Behind the throne, which he clasps, stands Hertford (or Conyngham, cf. No. 13847) holding a staff topped by antlers; he gapes at the speaker, saying, "I never heard a speech from a Lady so Cunning—." The King adds "Hum!" On his right stands Bloomfield, looking slyly sideways at his master. Both wear frilled muslin boudoir-caps. There is no dais, and on the right two grovelling women kiss, one the King's left foot, the other his thigh. A third kneels beside them. On the left is a hideous negress, who says: "God bless Massa he kiss his black servant in the kitchen at Brighton [see No. 13208, &c.], my good Massa, make no distinction, Black or White, Massa Love'm all." On the extreme left is the profile of a noseless prostitute. On the King's throne is half a (bisected) crown, emblem of the repudiation of Queen Caroline, see No. 13826. After the title:
    '"Which both by Art and Nature is"
    "The sport of sense, the toy of ladies." Royal Fable.'
    c. February 1821
    Hand-coloured etching

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  • Producer name

  • School/style

  • Date

    • 1821
  • Production place

  • Materials

  • Technique

  • Dimensions

    • Height: 240 millimetres
    • Width: 337 millimetres
  • Inscriptions

      • Inscription Content

        Lettered with title and text in image, and "London Pubd by J.L.Marks 28 Fetter Lane Fleet Street".
  • Curator's comments

    (Description and comment from M. Dorothy George, 'Catalogue of Political and Personal Satires in the British Museum', X, 1952)
    For loyal addresses to the King see No. 14105, &c. Lord Hertford was still Lord Chamberlain; he resigned on 23 July, and the King was anxious that Lord Conyngham should succeed him; this the Ministers were determined to prevent, and in December he became Lord Steward of the Household. 'Letters of George IV', 1938, ii. 448 f.

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  • Bibliography

    • BM Satires 14124 bibliographic details
  • Location

    Caricatures XII p.135

  • Subjects

  • Associated names

  • Acquisition name

  • Acquisition date

    1935

  • Department

    Prints & Drawings

  • Registration number

    1935,0522.12.135

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Object reference number: PPA180634

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