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To celebrate Vikings Live, we have replaced our Roman alphabet with the runic alphabet used by the Vikings, the Scandinavian ‘Younger Futhark’. The ‘Younger Futhark’ has only 16 letters, so we have used some of the runic letters more than once or combined two runes for one Roman letter.

For an excellent introduction to runes, we recommend Martin Findell’s book published by British Museum Press.

More information about how we have ‘runified’ this site

 

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cloth

  • Object type

  • Museum number

    Af2006,15.93

  • Description

    Cloth; fancy-printed on cotton; blue cloth with white borders; repeating background print dark blue plant?; yellow, dark blue and red stripes top and bottom border; two main repeating patterns: 1) white circle bordered with yellow stripe, "37 MILITARY HOSPITAL METHODIST PRESBY CHURCH" in blue, red stripe inside edge, dark blue house on blue circle at centre; 2) logo labelled "GHANA ARMED FORCES" in black on white background, yellow bird on either side of anchor, sword crossed with stick and black triangle with red markings, two feathers with "GAF" at centre below birds, "GHANA ARMED FORCES" in black on yellow banner below; "AKOSOMBO TEXTILES LIMITED GUARANTEED SUPERB PRINTS" printed in border.

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  • Producer name

  • Date

    • 18 August 2004
  • Production place

  • Materials

  • Technique

  • Dimensions

    • Length: 54.5 centimetres
    • Width: 114.5 centimetres
  • Curator's comments

    'Fancy prints are cheaper to produce and buy, but their designs often imitate the wax prints. They are printed on one side only by engraved rollers or printing screens. These cloths often feature photographic images making them a popular choice for commemorating or promoting important social political or cultural events.

    Both wax and fancy print cloths are bought at market and given to tailors to make clothes worn by men, women or children.’
    ‘Missionaries and churches have often used printed cloths, both wax and fancy printed, as a means of communicating with wide audiences in Ghana. Printed cloths are produced to convey religious messages to their followers or to celebrate important national or international religious events, such as anniversaries or a visit by the pope.

    Christianity is widely practised, especially in southern Ghana, the churches most notably represented being the Roman Catholic, Methodist and Presbyterian. Recently, Charismatic churches have gained considerable popularity. Islam predominates in the north of the country. A sizable percentage of the population continues to follow indigenous religions.’

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  • Subjects

  • Acquisition name

  • Acquisition date

    2006

  • Department

    Africa, Oceania & the Americas

  • Registration number

    Af2006,15.93

Cloth; fancy-printed on cotton; blue cloth with white borders; repeating background print dark blue plant?; yellow, dark blue and red stripes top and bottom border; two main repeating patterns: 1) white circle bordered with yellow stripe, "37 MILITARY HOSPITAL METHODIST PRESBY CHURCH" in blue, red stripe inside edge, dark blue house on blue circle at centre; 2) logo labelled "GHANA ARMED FORCES" in black on white background, yellow bird on either side of anchor, sword crossed with stick and black triangle with red markings, two feathers with "GAF" at centre below birds, "GHANA ARMED FORCES" in black on yellow banner below; "AKOSOMBO TEXTILES LIMITED GUARANTEED SUPERB PRINTS" printed in border.

Front:Section(Textile)

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Object reference number: EAF84009

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