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painting / handscroll

  • Object type

  • Museum number

    1925,0218,0.1

  • Description

    Handscroll, now mounted and framed. This short handscroll depicts the encounter between Śākyamuni and Hārītī. The painting shows Śākyamuni at the opening of the scroll, on the right, seated amidst Buddhist and Daoist deities viewing numerous demons trying to raise the bowl with a hoist and tackle. Other spirits and gods, including the Mother of Lightning and the Duke of Thunder, lend their support to Hārītī, who stands at the centre. In the ‘Samyuktaratna-piṭaka’ the Mother of Demons 'exhausted her powers' attempting to free the child, capitulated to the Buddha, and agreed to obey his precepts. Painted in ink and colours on silk.

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  • Producer name

  • Culture/period

  • Date

    • 15thC-17thC
  • Production place

  • Findspot

  • Materials

  • Technique

  • Dimensions

    • Height: 27.3 centimetres
    • Length: 109 centimetres
  • Inscriptions

      • Inscription Type

        seal
      • Inscription Language

        Chinese
      • Inscription Content

        後隔水騎縫印:□□圖書(朱文方印 relief)、□西□(朱文葫蘆印 relief)、沐璘廷章(白文方印 intaglio)。
      • Inscription Type

        seal
      • Inscription Language

        Chinese
      • Inscription Content

        後隔水鈐:黔寧王子子孫孫永保之(白文方印)、征南將軍圖書(朱文方印)。
  • Curator's comments

    Zwalf 1985

    This short handscroll depicts the encounter between Śākyamuni and Hārītī (Chinese Guizi mu), Mother of Demons, when the Buddha imprisoned her favourite son under his alms bowl in order to make her experience the anguish she caused humans by devouring their children. Similar to six others, the painting shows Śākyamuni at the opening of the scroll, on the right, seated amidst Buddhist and Daoist deities viewing numerous demons trying to raise the bowl with a hoist and tackle. Other spirits and gods, including the Mother of Lightning and the Duke of Thunder, lend their support to Hārītī, who stands at the centre. In the ‘Samyuktaratna-piṭaka’ the Mother of Demons 'exhausted her powers' attempting to free the child, capitulated to the Buddha, and agreed to obey his precepts. These Chinese pictorial versions of the story are notable for equating Hārītī's powers with a legion of demons, depicted graphically and rather wittily.

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  • Bibliography

    • Zwalf 1985 325 bibliographic details
    • Toda & Ogawa 1998 E15-343 bibliographic details
  • Location

    Not on display

  • Subjects

  • Associated names

  • Acquisition date

    1925

  • Department

    Asia

  • Registration number

    1925,0218,0.1

  • Additional IDs

    • Ch.Ptg.Add.29 (Chinese Painting Additional Number)
Handscroll, now mounted and framed. This short handscroll depicts the encounter between Sakyamuni and Hariti. The painting shows Sakyamuni at the opening of the scroll, on the right, seated amidst Buddhist and Daoist deities viewing numerous demons trying

Handscroll, now mounted and framed. This short handscroll depicts the encounter between Sakyamuni and Hariti. The painting shows Sakyamuni at the opening of the scroll, on the right, seated amidst Buddhist and Daoist deities viewing numerous demons trying

Image description

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