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plaque

  • Object type

  • Museum number

    1872,0701.122

  • Description

    Plaque. Terracotta plaque with a figure of Śiva on a trotting bull (Vrsabharudhamurti); broken and repaired; made of carved terracotta.

  • Date

    • 8thC-9thC (circa)
  • Findspot

  • Materials

  • Technique

  • Dimensions

    • Height: 32 centimetres
    • Width: 20.5 centimetres
  • Curator's comments

    Shiva holds a curving horn, a feature seen in the later art of Bengal (TRB).

  • Condition

    Returned from conservation August 1998.

  • Conservation

    See treatments 

    Treatment date

    28 July 1998

    Reason for treatment

    Photography

    Treatment proposal

    Restick to make stable. Fill and paint if necessary.

    Condition

    Previously restored, most joins broken, one intact in upper right. Several small areas missing. Parts of edges and surface abraded as if with wire brush. Thick layer of old adhesive on break edges. Small amounts of old white filler on edges and spreading onto front surface. Possible thin light colour slip over parts of surface. Traces of old pigment, mainly red, some of it associated with old repair as on top of filler. Surface dirty.

    Treatment details

    Dry cleaned with Rowney's kneadable putty rubber (vulcanized rubber) rolled over surface. Old filler removed mechanically with scalpel as far as possible, left where ingrained in the terracotta surface. Loose old adhesive removed, remainder swabbed with acetone. Reconstructed using HMG heatproof and waterproof adhesive (cellulose nitrate) . Joins supported with vacuum cushion during curing. Uneven back surface made it difficult to support horizontally during curing. Lower section was reassembled, then supported against a board stood upright in a sand tray. Remainder of the plaque was then reassembled vertically. Left to cure undisturbed for several days due to the large amount of HMG used in the poorly-fitting joins. Missing areas filled with Polyfilla interior (calcium sulphate hydrate,cellulose ether) mixed with water. Finshed with Modostuc filler (calcium sulphate, barium sulphate) where Polyfilla had shrunk. Cut back with a scalpel blade and sanded smooth with various grades of abrasive paper. After consulting the curator, no attempt was made to mould missing areas of the raised figures, and the fills were left unpainted. Plaster fills sealed with Paraloid B72 (ethyl methacrylate copolymer) in 50/50 Acetone /Industrial methylated spirits (ethanol,methanol) applied by brush.

    About these records 

  • Subjects

  • Associated names

  • Acquisition name

  • Acquisition date

    1872

  • Acquisition notes

    Purchased by John Bridge at the Stuart sale at Christie's in June, 1830. The collection was given to the British Museum in 1872 by Mrs John Bridge and his nieces, Miss Fanny Bridge and Mrs Edgar Baker, on the death that year of George Bridge, brother of John Bridge.

  • Department

    Asia

  • Registration number

    1872,0701.122

  • Additional IDs

    • Bridge 104

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Object reference number: RRI12213

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