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standard

  • Object type

  • Museum number

    1872,0701.132

  • Description

    Standard (Burmese: tagundaing). A wooden pole with a lattice of lacquer attached by six pegs; surmounted by a human-headed figure of a hamsa (sacred goose). Made of gilded and glass inlaid wood.[Originally part of 1872. 7-1. 6]

  • Date

    • 18thC(late)-19thC(early)
  • Production place

  • Materials

  • Technique

  • Dimensions

    • Height: 265 centimetres (approximately)
  • Bibliography

    • Isaacs & Blurton 2000 cat. 113, p. 166 bibliographic details
  • Exhibition history

    2000 Apr - 2000 Aug, BM, 'Visions from the Golden Land: Burma and the Art of Lacquer.'

  • Conservation

    See treatments 

    Treatment date

    30 November 1999

    Reason for treatment

    Temporary Exhibition

    Treatment proposal

    CLEAN AND REPAIR

    Condition

    THE OBJECT WAS VERY DUSTY AND DIRTY. THERE WERE SOME LOOSE OR DETACHED AREAS ON THE PIERCED PANEL, AND THE MODERN BASE OF THE STANDARD WAS CHIPPED AND SCUFFED. THE METAL FLOWER AT THE BASE OF THE BIRD WAS LOOSE, BECAUSE THE ORIGINAL RESINOUS PLUG WHICH HELD IT IN PLACE HAD CRACKED AND DETACHED.

    Treatment details

    THE OBJECT WAS FUIRST CLEANED WITH A VACUUM CLEANER TO REMOVE LOOSE DUST AND DIRT. THEN IT WAS CLEANED WITH A SOLUTION OF A FEW DROPS OF Synperonic N (non ionic detergent,nonylphenol ethylene oxide condensate) IN DISTILLED WATER. ON THE PIERCED DECORATION THIS WAS APPLIED WITH A BRUSH AND MOPPED UP WITH LARGE WADS OF TISSUE BEFORE A MORE DETAILED CLEAN WITH COTTON WOOL SWABS. DETACHED AREAS OF THE PIERCED PANEL WERE REATTACHED USING HMG heatproof and waterproof adhesive (cellulose nitrate). HMG WAS ALSO USED TO REATTACH THE ORIGINAL RESIN PLUG HOLDING THE METAL FLOWER IN PLACE, TO SECURE IT. LOOSE AREAS OF THE PIERCED PANEL WERE SECURED USING A 25% SOLUTION OF VINAMUL 3252 PVAC ADHESIVE, APPLIED WITH A BRUSH AFTER WETTING THE AREA WITH WHITE SPIRIT TO ACT AS A MASK AND WETTING AGENT. THESE AREAS WERE CLAMPED DURING DRYING. THE CHIPS IN THE BASE WERE FILLED WITH BONDA WOODFILL POLYSTYRENE FILLER, TINTED WITH PIGMENTS. THE FILLER WAS SMOOTHED TO SHAPE WHILE STILL WET USING ACETONE ON TISSUE SWABS.

    About these records 

  • Acquisition name

  • Acquisition notes

    Purchased by John Bridge at the Stuart sale at Christie's in June, 1830. The collection was given to the British Museum in 1872 by Mrs John Bridge and his nieces, Miss Fanny Bridge and Mrs Edgar Baker, on the death that year of George Bridge, brother of John Bridge.

  • Department

    Asia

  • Registration number

    1872,0701.132

  • Additional IDs

    • 1880.3534 (1970s tracking number, no longer used.)
Garuda standard consisting of a wooden pole with lattice of lacquer attached by six pegs; surmounted by a human-headed figure of Garuda.

Side

Garuda standard consisting of a wooden pole with lattice of lacquer attached by six pegs; surmounted by a human-headed figure of Garuda.

Image description

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Object reference number: RRI2808

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