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drawing

  • Object type

  • Museum number

    2000,1012,0.15

  • Description

    Drawing of an alpana (Bihari, aripana) using black ink on hand-made paper. Made for Lakṣmī pūjā, the alpana has a central circular design set within a (?) lotus blossom. This central design is made up of a cruciform element with, at its heart, depictions of four-armed Viṣṇu, and Lakṣmī. Leading away from the centre of the alpana is a path with footprints which reaches a small shrine with a deity inside (perhaps Viṣṇu). The rest of the field is filled with symbols, flowers and figures. Two heads at the top are perhaps to be taken as the Sun and the Moon. A border of floral design also in black ink marks the edge of the paper.

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  • Producer name

  • School/style

  • Date

    • 1965-1972
  • Production place

  • Materials

  • Technique

  • Dimensions

    • Width: 76.2 centimetres
    • Height: 56 centimetres
  • Inscriptions

      • Inscription Type

        inscription
      • Inscription Script

        Roman
      • Inscription Position

        reverse
      • Inscription Language

        German
      • Inscription Content

        Aripana , dem Gott "Vishnu" gewidmet. Vermutlich fur d. Hausalter, ober die Masken von (l. n. r.) Mond, 2 sternen und Sonne. Der Rand aus symbolisierten Lotusbluten in der Form einer "Yoni" des weiblichen Geschlechtsorgans.
      • Inscription Comment

        Also on the reverse is the stamp of Dr Sen-Gupta - Sammlung Dr. Sen Gupta
      • Inscription Type

        inscription
      • Inscription Script

        Devanagari
      • Inscription Position

        reverse
      • Inscription Language

        Hindi or Bihari
      • Inscription Translation

        The name and address of the artist - Urmila Devi, Ranti village
  • Curator's comments

    Dr Sen-Gupta believes that Madhubani paintings made with ink as here, are the work of Kayasth, rather than Brahmin families (who use paint).

  • Bibliography

    • Vequaud 1977 bibliographic details
    • Jain 1997 Work on the most famous of the Mithila artists, Ganga Devi. bibliographic details
  • Condition

    Good

  • Subjects

  • Associated names

  • Acquisition name

  • Acquisition date

    2000

  • Acquisition notes

    Acquired by Dr Sen-Gupta in Delhi in 1972 from the Bihar State Emporium (ASG says 'they were chosen from those available in the godown' - ie not merely from those in the emporium).

  • Department

    Asia

  • Registration number

    2000,1012,0.15

Drawing of an alpana (Bihari, aripana) using black ink on hand-made paper.  Made for Lak?mi puja, the alpana has a central circular design set within a (?) lotus blossom.  This central design is made up of a cruciform element with, at its heart, depictions of four-armed Vishnu, and Lak?mi.  Leading away from the centre of the alpana is a path with footprints which reaches a small shrine with a deity inside (perhaps Vishnu).  The rest of the field is filled with symbols, flowers and figures. Two heads at the top are perhaps to be taken as the Sun and the Moon.  A border of floral design also in black ink marks the edge of the paper.

Recto

Drawing of an alpana (Bihari, aripana) using black ink on hand-made paper. Made for Lak?mi puja, the alpana has a central circular design set within a (?) lotus blossom. This central design is made up of a cruciform element with, at its heart, depictions of four-armed Vishnu, and Lak?mi. Leading away from the centre of the alpana is a path with footprints which reaches a small shrine with a deity inside (perhaps Vishnu). The rest of the field is filled with symbols, flowers and figures. Two heads at the top are perhaps to be taken as the Sun and the Moon. A border of floral design also in black ink marks the edge of the paper.

Image description

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Object reference number: RFI30875

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