What just happened?

To celebrate Vikings Live, we have replaced our Roman alphabet with the runic alphabet used by the Vikings, the Scandinavian ‘Younger Futhark’. The ‘Younger Futhark’ has only 16 letters, so we have used some of the runic letters more than once or combined two runes for one Roman letter.

For an excellent introduction to runes, we recommend Martin Findell’s book published by British Museum Press.

More information about how we have ‘runified’ this site

 

Collection online

Additional options
Production date to

Or search by

Searching...

papercut / banner

  • Object type

  • Museum number

    Am1990,08.489

  • Description

    Banner of papercuts; cut with chisel from tissue paper; paper folded over string and glued; white design shows smoking skulls on coffin; fuchsia design shows La Catrina head and torso (skeleton wearing wide-brimmed hat with feathers on top) on coffin; blue design shows skeleton seated on stool looking at skull on top of coffin on altar; yellow design shows La Catrina head and upper body (skeleton wearing wide-brimmed hat with feathers on top, fan in left hand); red design shows girl on left, coconut palm on right; white design shows skeleton man wearing sombrero and serape (sarape in Spanish), skeleton woman in skirt dancing; green design shows kneeling angel at right, cross at left; fuchsia design shows La Catrina head and torso (skeleton wearing wide-brimmed hat with feathers on top) on coffin; yellow design shows La Catrina head and upper body (skeleton wearing wide-brimmed hat with feathers on top, fan in left hand); red design shows girl on left, coconut palm on right. Used in Day of the Dead Festival.

    More 

  • Producer name

  • Date

    • 1980s
  • Production place

  • Materials

  • Technique

  • Dimensions

    • Height: 35.5 centimetres (folded flat)
    • Width: 47 centimetres (folded flat)
  • Curator's comments

    This size of papercut is referred to as "medio pliego", from a half sheet. This type of papercutting is focused especially in San Salvador Huixcolotla. Artists from other areas have copied this style, but San Salvador Huixcolotla remains the centre, with key families such as the Vivancos and the Rojas carrying on the tradition. See Carmichael, Elizabeth and Sayer, Chloë. The Skeleton at the Feast, The Day of the Dead in Mexico. London: British Museum Press, 1991 pp. 101-107 for description of papercutting in San Salvador Huixcolotla; Fig. 107 p. 103 shows Maurilio Rojas at work.

    More 

  • Subjects

  • Associated events

    • Used at: Day of the Dead
  • Acquisition name

  • Acquisition date

    1990

  • Department

    Africa, Oceania & the Americas

  • Registration number

    Am1990,08.489

Banner of papercuts; cut with chisel from tissue paper; paper folded over string and glued; white design shows smoking skulls on coffin; fuchsia design shows La Catrina head and torso (skeleton wearing wide-brimmed hat with feathers on top) on coffin; blue design shows skeleton seated on stool looking at skull on top of coffin on altar; yellow design shows La Catrina head and upper body (skeleton wearing wide-brimmed hat with feathers on top, fan in left hand); red design shows girl on left, coconut palm on right; white design shows skeleton man wearing sombrero and serape (sarape in Spanish), skeleton woman in skirt dancing; green design shows kneeling angel at right, cross at left; fuchsia design shows La Catrina head and torso (skeleton wearing wide-brimmed hat with feathers on top) on coffin; yellow design shows La Catrina head and upper body (skeleton wearing wide-brimmed hat with feathers on top, fan in left hand); red design shows girl on left, coconut palm on right. Used in Day of the Dead Festival.

Recommend


Feedback

If you’ve noticed a mistake or have any further information about this object, please email: collectiondatabase@britishmuseum.org 

View open data for this object with SPARQL endpoint

Object reference number: ESA80078

British Museum collection data is also available in the W3C open data standard, RDF, allowing it to join and relate to a growing body of linked data published by organisations around the world.

View this object

Support the Museum:
donate online

The Museum makes its collection database available to be used by scholars around the world. Donations will help support curatorial, documentation and digitisation projects.

About the database

The British Museum collection database is a work in progress. New records, updates and images are added every week.

More about the database 

Supporters

Work on this database is supported by a range of sponsors, donors and volunteers.

More about supporters and how you
can help  

Loading...