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Purvi Raga

  • Object type

  • Museum number

    1999,1202,0.2.24

  • Title (object)

    • Purvi Raga
  • Description

    Painting from an album bound in red silk designed fabric containing a complete set of Jaipur 19th century Ragamala paintings.

    The nayika sits on a terrace holding her arms over her head and twisting her body, a standard iconography for this ragini. She is dressed in brilliant gold patterned skirt, yellow choli and blue and red gold bordered odhni. Two lady attendants stand on either side one holding a fly whisk, the other appears to be clapping her hands and singing, pehaps to distract her distressed mistress.

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  • School/style

  • Date

    • 19thC(early)
  • Production place

  • Materials

  • Technique

  • Dimensions

    • Height: 32 centimetres (page)
    • Width: 24.2 centimetres
    • Height: 24.4 centimetres (painting including all margins)
    • Width: 19.7 centimetres
  • Inscriptions

      • Inscription Type

        inscription
      • Inscription Script

        Devanagiri
      • Inscription Position

        top
      • Inscription Language

        braj bhasa
      • Inscription Translation

        The attendant standing near plies the flywhisk The beloved lady lazily tarried for a long time She raised her hands over her head lazily and yawned And contemplated her beloved and brought his picture to her mind She sank down on the earth in a swoon As if in a very severe illness confined This is the ragini of Dipaka raga Known by the name of Purvi or whose beauty is described as without parallel.
      • Inscription Comment

        Translation taken from Gangoly, O.C.'Ragas and Raginis, Vol.2.' Plate LXIV.
      • Inscription Type

        inscription
      • Inscription Script

        Devanagiri
      • Inscription Position

        Front cover of Album
      • Inscription Language

        local dialect, probably Rajasthani
      • Inscription Transliteration

        (Difficult to transliterate the beginning. Text unclear). - - Pana muraqqo pame 36. Labar 2.
      • Inscription Translation

        ( -? - ). Album has 36 folios. Number 2.
      • Inscription Comment

        The text inscribed above each illustration is attributed to a poet named Lal by the scholar Ebeling, K. in 'Ragamala Painting' and most translations have been verified by matching the original with the brajbhasa texts in O.C.Gangoly's book 'Ragas and Raginis, Vol.2.' Some have been translated with the help of Dr. Rupert Snell from the School of Oriental and African Studies, London.
  • Curator's comments

    The series is a complete one of thirty six based on the 'standardized painters system' existing in Jaipur during the 19th century. Black ink floral sprays on first and last pages.
    Jaipur 19th century Ragamala paintings characteristically depict text in enclosed decorative panels or cartouches on top of each painting. (Ebeling, K., 'Ragamala Painting', 1973. Pg.228, illustration 148.) The rasa is love in separation.

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  • Condition

    Good

  • Subjects

  • Associated names

  • Associated places

  • Acquisition name

  • Acquisition date

    1999

  • Department

    Asia

  • Registration number

    1999,1202,0.2.24

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Object reference number: RFI35333

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