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The month of Asoj

  • Object type

  • Museum number

    1999,1202,0.5.4

  • Title (object)

    • The month of Asoj
  • Description

    One of a series of eight paintings bound in an album. The series are from a 'Baramasa' set or 'Songs of the seasons' providing visual imagery for Baramasa poetry. The main theme is that of nayakas' and nayikas' (lovers) love in union and in separation and their relationship with the months of the year.

    The painting is divided into three sections in order to illustrate the text fully. To the left of the illustration Radha and Krishna are shown on an open terrace in an architectural setting. Krishna appears to be leaving while Radha offers him a betelnut in an attempt to make him stay. A lady attendant with a flywhisk stands next to them. Krishna is garbed in gold jama with a flower pattern, bright orange pyjamas and crowned with the quintessential lotus blossoms sprouting from a gold crown over an orange turban.
    The second section, the background of the painting depicts a night scene with Krishna dancing the Raslila and a King touring his kingdom, providing direct visual imagery to Keshavdas' text. Two Brahmins perform Durgā pūjā (prayers) in front of a golden palace.
    The third section depicts a thin lined horizon with rising sun, a forested landscape, lotus pool in the foreground with pandits reciting prayers for dead ancestors.

    More 

  • School/style

  • Date

    • 1675-1700 (circa)
  • Production place

  • Technique

  • Dimensions

    • Height: 30.6 centimetres (page)
    • Width: 22 centimetres
    • Height: 26 centimetres (painting including black and white margins)
    • Width: 17.3 centimetres
  • Inscriptions

      • Inscription Type

        inscription
      • Inscription Position

        front page
      • Inscription Content

        Album no.10
      • Inscription Type

        inscription
      • Inscription Script

        Devanagiri
      • Inscription Position

        top
      • Inscription Language

        braj bhasa
      • Inscription Translation

        During this month the spirits of the ancestors come down to earth to receive propitiations. People worship the nine Durgas for success in life and salvation beyond. Kings accompanied by pandits (religious advisors) set out on tour to see their kingdoms. The poet Keshavdas says, the sky is clear after the rainy season and lotuses are in bloom. The moon illuminates the nights which tend to be clear in this month. Lord Visnu and consort, Lakshmi dance a celestial dance. The nayika requests her lover not to leave her in this month which is perfect for making love.
      • Inscription Comment

        Poetry on Baramasa by Keshavdas of Orccha. Translation taken from Dwivedi, V.P. 'Barahmasa. The Song of Seasons in Literature and Art.' 1980.
  • Curator's comments

    This series seems to be drawn, composed and coloured by one artist and is so similar to a Bundi Baramasa painting in Pal, P. 'Dancing to the Flute', p.88, as to suggest them belonging to the same series. The similarity in foliage depiction, architectural details such as the predominant use of white and green, patterning on walls and rooftops, Krishna's face presenting a distinctive profile with large Bundi eye and prominent nose in all paintings in this series point to the hand of one master artist. Krishna's crown on top of an orange turban is present in all of the paintings including the one in Pal, '97, which further corroborates these belonging to the same series. This early Bundi series has a vibrant spirit that is imparted by the interplay of brilliant colours, intense emotional cross currents between the lovers that convey the bhakti or devotion of the times, and a lyricism that makes the paintings come alive. The emphasis on diagonal lines impart movement; the lush vegetation and sensuous figures all contribute to the dynamic vibrancy of these works. The figures are modelled and shaded after Mughal painting to impart volume.

    More 

  • Bibliography

    • Pal 1993 bibliographic details
    • Blurton 2006 p.29 bibliographic details
  • Conservation

    See treatments 

    Treatment date

    27 June 2007

    Treatment proposal

    Mount

    Condition

    Unmounted

    Treatment details

    Mount - Overthrow - R

    Inlay - Slot

    About these records 

  • Subjects

  • Associated names

  • Associated titles

    • Associated Title: Baramasa
    • Associated Title: Songs of the Seasons
  • Acquisition name

  • Acquisition date

    1999

  • Department

    Asia

  • Registration number

    1999,1202,0.5.4

One of a series of eight paintings bound in an album. The series are from a 'Baramasa' set or 'Songs of the seasons' providing visual imagery for Baramasa poetry. The main theme is that of nayakas' and nayikas' (lovers) love in union and in separation and their relationship with the months of the year.

The painting is divided into three sections in order to illustrate the text fully. To the left of the illustration Radha and Krishna are shown on an open terrace in an architectural setting. Krishna appears to be leaving while Radha offers him a betelnut in an attempt to make him stay. A lady attendant with a flywhisk stands next to them. Krishna is garbed in gold jama with a flower pattern, bright orange pyjamas and crowned with the quintessential lotus blossoms sprouting from a gold crown over an orange turban. 

The second section, the background of the painting depicts a night scene with Krishna dancing the Raslila and a King touring his kingdom, providing direct visual imagery to Keshavdas' text. Two Brahmins perform Durga puja (prayers) in front of a golden palace.

The third section depicts a thin lined horizon with rising sun, a forested landscape, lotus pool in the foreground with pandits reciting prayers for dead ancestors.

One of a series of eight paintings bound in an album. The series are from a 'Baramasa' set or 'Songs of the seasons' providing visual imagery for Baramasa poetry. The main theme is that of nayakas' and nayikas' (lovers) love in union and in separation and their relationship with the months of the year. The painting is divided into three sections in order to illustrate the text fully. To the left of the illustration Radha and Krishna are shown on an open terrace in an architectural setting. Krishna appears to be leaving while Radha offers him a betelnut in an attempt to make him stay. A lady attendant with a flywhisk stands next to them. Krishna is garbed in gold jama with a flower pattern, bright orange pyjamas and crowned with the quintessential lotus blossoms sprouting from a gold crown over an orange turban. The second section, the background of the painting depicts a night scene with Krishna dancing the Raslila and a King touring his kingdom, providing direct visual imagery to Keshavdas' text. Two Brahmins perform Durga puja (prayers) in front of a golden palace. The third section depicts a thin lined horizon with rising sun, a forested landscape, lotus pool in the foreground with pandits reciting prayers for dead ancestors.

Image description

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