Collection online

strip / ornament

  • Object type

  • Museum number

    2005,0902.1

  • Description

    Strip of beaten sheet gold in the shape of a crescent. The ends are slightly expanded to form oval terminals with a central circular perforation. One of the terminals is broken across the perforation. This possibly happened in antiquity as a second circular perforation has been created in the neck of the terminal. The edges of the strip, including the terminals, are defined by a neat row of pointillé.

    More 

  • Culture/period

  • Date

    • 2500BC-2000BC (circa)
  • Findspot

  • Materials

  • Technique

  • Dimensions

    • Length: 264 millimetres
    • Width: 11.7 millimetres
    • Thickness: 0.1 millimetres
    • Weight: 2.9 grammes
  • Curator's comments

    The precise form of this ornament is new, but it can be related stylistically to the earliest goldwork in Britain and Western Europe. Although recalling to mind the gold lunulae most often found in Ireland, the Braithwaite piece is much less substantial and elaborate. Neither does it have the strong curvature of lunulae. It is an important addition to the repertoire of primary beaker goldwork from Britain.

    Non-destructive X-ray fluorescence analysis of the surface of the gold strip from Braithwaite by the British Museum indicated a gold content of approximately 90%.

    S.P. Needham

    More 

  • Bibliography

    • Murgia et al 2014 1.5.2 bibliographic details
    • TAR 2001 p. 14, no. 1 bibliographic details
  • Location

    Not on display

  • Acquisition name

  • Acquisition date

    2005

  • Department

    Britain, Europe and Prehistory

  • Registration number

    2005,0902.1

  • Additional IDs

    • 2001T88 (Treasure number)
Strip of sheet gold in an even crescentic shape, broadest in the middle and tapering to the ends. The terminals are expanded a little to form oval tabs, each with a central perforation. One tab is broken across the perforation, apparently in antiquity, wi

Strip of sheet gold in an even crescentic shape, broadest in the middle and tapering to the ends. The terminals are expanded a little to form oval tabs, each with a central perforation. One tab is broken across the perforation, apparently in antiquity, wi

Image description

Recommend


Feedback

If you’ve noticed a mistake or have any further information about this object, please email: collectiondatabase@britishmuseum.org 

View open data for this object with SPARQL endpoint

Object reference number: BCB124586

British Museum collection data is also available in the W3C open data standard, RDF, allowing it to join and relate to a growing body of linked data published by organisations around the world.

View this object

Support the Museum:
donate online

The Museum makes its collection database available to be used by scholars around the world. Donations will help support curatorial, documentation and digitisation projects.

About the database

The British Museum collection database is a work in progress. New records, updates and images are added every week.

More about the database 

Supporters

Work on this database is supported by a range of sponsors, donors and volunteers.

More about supporters and how you
can help  

Loading...