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perforated baton

  • Object type

  • Museum number

    Palart.310

  • Description

    Antler bâton fragment with a near-cylindrical section except that the part of the shaft decorated with a horse has, on the reverse surface, three grooves so deeply cut that they greatly reduce the thickness of the beam. Single perforation in the centre and is broken at both ends. Obverse surface has a deep longitudinal groove along the upper edge, interrupted to the left of the perforation by the mane of a horse, cut in low relief and facing right. This figure has a large eye, high boxed mane and rather small backswept forelegs, also a V-shaped double gash on its flank.

    More 

  • Culture/period

  • Findspot

  • Materials

  • Dimensions

    • Length: 16.6 centimetres
    • Width: 5.5 centimetres
    • Thickness: 3 centimetres
  • Curator's comments

    Ice Age art

  • Bibliography

    • Sieveking 1987 310 bibliographic details
  • Location

    G2/wp50

  • Exhibition history

    Exhibited:

    2013 24 Jun-16 Sep, Spain, Santander, Fundación Botín, Ice Age Art
    2013 7 Feb-26 May, London, BM Ice Age Art
    2010 Apr-Jun, Leeds, Henry Moore Institute, Ice Age Sculpture
    2006 11 May-30 Jul, London, Hayward Gallery, The Enemy Within (Undercover Surrealism)

  • Conservation

    See treatments 

    Treatment date

    10 January 2006

    Treatment proposal

    Reduce shine from old coating. Check and consolidate chipped area as necessary.

    Condition

    Light sheen from old coating over whole surface. Old fill around central hole with dark paint layer. Small chipped area within hole.

    Treatment details

    Tested surface coating with acetone, IMS and distilled water on cotton wool buds. These did not have much effect on surface coating. However the shiny dark paint on the fill was disfiguring and so it was toned in to a more appropriate colour with Liquitex acrylic colours, dry pigments and distilled water.

    Consolidated chipped area with 3% Paraloid B72 (ethyl methacrylate copolymer) in 50/50 acetone/IMS.

    About these records 

  • Subjects

  • Acquisition name

  • Department

    Britain, Europe and Prehistory

  • Registration number

    Palart.310

Antler bâton fragment with a near-cylindrical section except that the part of the shaft decorated with a horse has, on the reverse surface, three grooves so deeply cut that they greatly reduce the thickness of the beam.  Single perforation in the centre and is broken at both ends.  Obverse surface has a deep longitudinal groove along the upper edge, interrupted to the left of the perforation by the mane of a horse, cut in low relief and facing right.  This figure has a large eye, high boxed mane and rather small backswept forelegs, also a V-shaped double gash on its flank.

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Object reference number: BCR113539

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