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shield

  • Object type

  • Museum number

    1991,0411.2862

  • Description

    Iron shield: Boss and hand-grip with associated mineralised leather and wood (tilia sp.) from the shield board. The boss is made from a single billet of iron and is conical with a short, upright collar and a narrow, slightly angled flange. Corroded to the underside of the flange is a narrow handgrip whose rivets, together with two others, attach the boss at the cardinal points to the shield board. All four have flat heads and a shank length of 12mm, the thickness of the shield board beneath the boss. Two, possibly three, further rivets (or nails, the evidence is not clear in the corrosion) are positioned at irregular intervals on the flange

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  • Culture/period

  • Findspot

  • Materials

  • Dimensions

    • Length: 132 millimetres (handgrip)
    • Diameter: 130 millimetres (boss)
    • Weight: 23.7 grammes (handgrip)
  • Bibliography

    • Carver 2005 p.245.12a bibliographic details
  • Exhibition history

    Exhibited:

    2002 12 Mar-present, Suffolk, Sutton Hoo Visitor Centre, 'Burial Ground of the Kings', LT Loan.

  • Conservation

    See treatments 

    Treatment date

    10 February 1993

    Treatment proposal

    . Remove from plaster support. Remove soil and clean to reveal detail.

    Condition

    Lifted on site in plaster jacket. Corroded.Stones and sand corroded onto surface. Brace damaged and incomplete. Organics fragile and friable condition.

    Treatment details

    Radiographed while still in plaster jacket, in DSR. Soil removed and sieved for iron fragments and organic remains. Sandy soil and stones corroded onto object removed manually with spatula and scalpel. Samples of wood retained in unconsolidated state for identification. Delay in treatment of object resulted from waiting for results of ID. Fragments of damaged brace and flange reconstructed with HMG Nitro-cellulose adhesive. Gaps on flange, brace, and two areas on the wall of boss filled with micro-balloons and HMG. Tinted to match with earth pigments and Paraloid B72 acrylic co-polmer in acetone applied by brush. Wood and leather consolidated with 2.5% Paraloid B72 in 50/50 IMS and acetone. Area under damaged end of brace supported with microballoons as above.

    About these records 

  • Acquisition name

  • Acquisition date

    1991

  • Acquisition notes

    Excavated 1982-1992. Excavation funded by The British Museum and the Society of Antiquaries, London.

  • Department

    Britain, Europe and Prehistory

  • Registration number

    1991,0411.2862

  • Additional IDs

    • 48/8277
Iron shield: Boss and hand-grip with associated mineralised leather and wood (tilia sp.) from the shield board. The boss is made from a single billet of iron and is conical with a short, upright collar and a narrow, slightly angled flange. Corroded to the underside of the flange is a narrow handgrip whose rivets, together with two others, attach the boss at the cardinal points to the shield board. All four have flat heads and a shank length of 12mm, the thickness of the shield board beneath the boss. Two, possibly three, further rivets (or nails, the evidence is not clear in the corrosion) are positioned at irregular intervals on the flange

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Object reference number: MCS24897

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