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How beautiful is virtue!!!

  • Object type

  • Museum number

    1868,0808.8427

  • Title (object)

    • How beautiful is virtue!!!
  • Description

    See No. 13731.
    [1] MODESTY! Lord Yarmouth, as an injured husband (see No. 11746, &c.) has just struck the Regent a blow on the nose, from which he staggers back, exclaiming: "Oh! Lord I have sprained my Ancle." Lady Yarmouth, seated (immodestly) on a sofa, watches, much alarmed. A wall-map is inscribed: 'A strait road from Wales to Yarmouth'. Below:
    "And fair exposed she stood shrunk from herself"
    "With fancy blushing,"
    [2] DIGNITY! A kitchen scene, (see Nos. 13208, &c., 13616). The Regent sits on the knee of a fat cook, while Bloomfield tries to embrace a slimmer cook-maid, who says: "What are you at you Bloom ing fellow." A third couple kiss in the background. Below:
    '—though amazed, are our neighbour Kings
    To see such Pow'r employ'd in Peaceful things.!'
    [3] CHASTITY!— George IV sits on a sofa embracing two very fat ladies, one wearing a small coronet. In the background and in back-view, are the ladies' husbands, arm-in-arm, both tall and thin and wearing court-suits; one holds a wand of office as Lord Chamberlain. Below: "Behold the blessed one of whom we speak—!"
    [4] NATIONAL LOVE! The Regent on the throne, his face concealed by a pillar (a convention deriving from No. 10709), graciously receives a file of (Manchester) Yeomanry, who hold up blood-stained sabres. Facing the throne stands a fat parson with drink-blotched face, who holds a large open 'Holy Bible', but also holds a scourge and fetters. The Regent says: "Gentn In the name of ye country I return you many thanks, for putting an end to the Sufferings of some of my poor Subjects." Below:
    "Impartial justice ever in our view,"
    "Fair to the public."
    c. June 1820
    Hand-coloured etching

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  • Producer name

  • School/style

  • Date

    • 1820
  • Materials

  • Technique

  • Dimensions

    • Height: 250 millimetres
    • Width: 351 millimetres
  • Inscriptions

      • Inscription Content

        Lettered: "B B del / Pubd by J. L. Marks 37 Princes St Soho".
  • Curator's comments

    (Description and comment from M. Dorothy George, 'Catalogue of Political and Personal Satires in the British Museum', X, 1952)
    [3] They seem to be Ladies Hertford and Conyngham, suggesting a date rather later than June, see No. 13847, &c.
    [4] For the Regent's thanks (21 Aug. 1819) to the Manchester magistrates and yeomanry see No. 13266, &c.; for the clerical magistrate see No. 13281, &c.

    (Supplementary information)
    'B B' in the inscription maybe B. Bergami.

    More 

  • Bibliography

    • BM Satires 13732 bibliographic details
  • Location

    Satires British 1820 Unmounted Roy

  • Subjects

  • Associated names

  • Acquisition name

  • Acquisition date

    1868

  • Department

    Prints & Drawings

  • Registration number

    1868,0808.8427

FOR DESCRIPTION SEE GEORGE (BMSat) 
Hand-coloured etching

FOR DESCRIPTION SEE GEORGE (BMSat) Hand-coloured etching

Image description

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