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[Poor frose out gardners]

  • Object type

  • Museum number

    1948,0214.806

  • Title (object)

    • [Poor frose out gardners]
  • Description

    Gardeners, unemployed and starving owing to the weather, walk in procession on the pavement past the screen of Carlton House, where, above the closed door is an open sash-window. In this the Regent (King, 29 Jan.) is seen sitting over a bottle with Lady Hertford. He looks over his shoulder with sour contempt, saying: "Let them starve, they are Radicals." The leader of the ragged band holds up a cabbage on a pole, saying: "Poor frose out Gardners" [used as title]; he approaches the sentinel who puts out a protesting hand. The others repeat this cry, or say: "Poor Gardners," while one, raising his hat, says: "God bliss you Ma-am." They pass a dandy (cf. No. 13029) who looks at them askance, while three other dandies inspect them from the right, one using a lorgnette. The shocks of hair of the gardeners give them a resemblance to dilapidated dandies. A sturdy John Bull, wearing a smock and with cudgel and dog confronts them in shocked surprise. Other spectators are a fishwife on the extreme left, a peg-legged sailor with a (hawker's) donkey who cries sardonically: "Old England For Ever O the Roast Beef of Old England O the English Roast Beef [Fielding's song, 'Grub Street Opera']." A coal-black chimney-sweep's boy exclaims: "My Eye What Rum Devils."
    c. January 1820
    Hand-coloured etching

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  • Producer name

  • School/style

  • Date

    • 1820
  • Materials

  • Technique

  • Dimensions

    • Height: 225 millimetres
    • Width: 336 millimetres
  • Curator's comments

    (Description and comment from M. Dorothy George, 'Catalogue of Political and Personal Satires in the British Museum', X, 1952)
    Six weeks of the coldest weather since 1814-15 ended in January. For the gardeners' parade, a common occurrence in cold weather, cf. Nos. 12185,
    15473 [3].

    (Supplementary information)
    Title and imprint cropped.

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  • Bibliography

    • BM Satires 13507 bibliographic details
  • Location

    Satires British 1820 Unmounted Roy

  • Subjects

  • Associated names

  • Acquisition name

  • Acquisition date

    1948

  • Department

    Prints & Drawings

  • Registration number

    1948,0214.806

FOR DESCRIPTION SEE GEORGE (BMSat) 
Hand-coloured etching

FOR DESCRIPTION SEE GEORGE (BMSat) Hand-coloured etching

Image description

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Object reference number: PPA87167

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