Collection online

Fanatick Madg

  • Object type

  • Museum number

    1850,1109.11

  • Title (object)

    • Fanatick Madg
  • Description

    Satire with an owl wearing spectacles standing on a closed book, beside him a candle rests on an open book (after a print by Cornelis Bloemaert, Roethlisberger H5)
    Engraving

  • Producer name

  • School/style

  • Date

    • 1685-1688
  • Materials

  • Technique

  • Dimensions

    • Height: 214 millimetres
    • Width: 167 millimetres
  • Inscriptions

      • Inscription Content

        Lettered at the top of the image with title; within, on a paper extending from the closed book, "The Association" and at lower right (partially erased) "Collins sculp"; below with four lines of verse reading, "Brethren & Sisters all give eare to what I shall you tell/Lets putt ye. Popish Bishops downe and Monarchy Expell/Then Liberty of Conscience shall to every one be free/Tinckers & Coblers all may preach and hey then up goe wee."
  • Curator's comments

    Stephens suggests that the print was published about 1647 as a satire on the Independents who had formed an Association in East Anglia in that year; he compared the verse to lines in Quarles' "Shepherd's Eclogue" (1644). However, the quality of the engraving, and especially of the lettering, is higher than anything else known at that date and it is more likely that the print was made in the 1680s in order to associate the campaign to oust James II with the popular movements of the Civil War period; the earliest known works of J Collins date from the mid 1670s.
    M.Jones 'The Print in Early Modern England: An Historical Oversight', New Haven and London, 2010, pp.169-171, especially footnotes 34 and 35.
    Jones supports a late seventeenth-century publication date stating that a notice of what sounds very like a copy of Henrik Bloemaert's painting at sales held on 21st June 1689, where 'A Droll of an Owl reading by a Candle' is recorded as lot 45, and on 24th March 1691, where lot 268 is listed as 'a piece of an Owl a reading'.
    For the original print by Bloemaert and its meaning, see Eddy de Jongh & Ger Luijten 'Mirror of everyday life, Genreprints in the Netherlands 1550-1700', Rijksmuseum 1997, p.192.
    Roethlisberger dates Bloemaert's print to c.1625.

    More 

  • Bibliography

    • BM Satires 228.I bibliographic details
    • Roethlisberger 1993 H5 (after) bibliographic details
  • Location

    Not on display (Satires British 1685 Unmounted Roy)

  • Subjects

  • Acquisition name

  • Acquisition date

    1850

  • Department

    Prints & Drawings

  • Registration number

    1850,1109.11

Satire with an owl wearing spectacles standing on a closed book, beside him a candle rests on an open book (after a print by Cornelis Bloemaert, Roethlisberger H5)  Engraving

Recto

Satire with an owl wearing spectacles standing on a closed book, beside him a candle rests on an open book (after a print by Cornelis Bloemaert, Roethlisberger H5) Engraving

Image description

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Object reference number: PPA83468

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