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collar

  • Object type

  • Museum number

    1900,0727.1

  • Description

    Gold collar. It was made from three circular sectioned and tapering gold bars that are fused at the ends forming a penannular neck-ring. A rectangular catch- plate is attached by hooks and close the collar. Two separately formed 'cups' of gold, each with an internal spike and moulding are riveted at either side of the collar.
    The bars are finely decorated with a complex incised geometric pattern. The decoration consists in series of triangles (dog's tooth design), parallel lines, rhombus shaped and zig-zag motifs located in the central part of the collar. A band of parallel lines and triangles decorate the terminals of the collar in the proximity of the cups.
    The catch- plate is decorated with five ribs, three of them have incised oblique lines.

    More 

  • Culture/period

  • Date

    • 1250BC-800BC (circa)
  • Findspot

  • Materials

  • Technique

  • Dimensions

    • Diameter: 124.21 millimetres (upper maximum)
    • Diameter: 119.4 millimetres (upper minimum)
    • Diameter: 134.58 millimetres (lower maximum)
    • Diameter: 134.58 millimetres (lower minimum)
    • Width: 37 millimetres (body centre)
    • Width: 17.69 millimetres (body end)
    • Thickness: 11.92 millimetres (body centre)
    • Thickness: 6.42 millimetres (body end)
    • Diameter: 19.11 millimetres (cup a)
    • Thickness: 1.39 millimetres (cup a)
    • Diameter: 18.84 millimetres (cup b)
    • Thickness: 1.45 millimetres (cup b)
    • Diameter: 20.32 millimetres (cup c)
    • Thickness: 1.42 millimetres (cup c)
    • Diameter: 19.36 millimetres (cup d)
    • Thickness: 1.36 millimetres (cup d)
    • Length: 77.27 millimetres (catch-plate)
    • Width: 21.31 millimetres (catch-plate)
    • Thickness: 3.06 millimetres (catch-plate)
    • Weight: 1254.8 grammes
  • Curator's comments

    The Sintra collar or torc is unique due to the three tapering bars fused at each end as well as the catch-plate and accompanying hooks. The decoration is however paralleled in contemporary torcs found in Spain such as Sagrajas, Badajoz (Perea 1991, 100-101).

    References

    Perea, A. 1991. Orfebreria Prerromana: arqueologia del oro. Madrid: Casa del Monte

    Note from the object file: 'three men working in a stone quarry in the Casal Amaro parish of Santa Maria, near Cintra, Portugal, declared having found on 26th March 1878 in the hollow of a stone in the said quarry a gold article of the shape of a bracelet, and the quarry being the property of Mr Joaquim Paulo, the latter said the three labourers were paid for their share of finding the said article a certain amount that was agreed upon between them'

    More 

  • Bibliography

    • Hawkes 1971 bibliographic details
    • Armbruster & Perea 2009 bibliographic details
    • Armbruster 1995 bibliographic details
    • Blurton 1997 161 bibliographic details
    • Murgia et al 2014 3.11.1.1 bibliographic details
  • Exhibition history

    Exhibited:

    2012-2013 Nov-Mar, Bonn, Kunst- und Ausstellungshalle, Treasures of the World's Cultures
    2012 Mar-Jul, Abu Dhabi, Manarat Al Saadiyat, Treasures of the World’s Cultures
    1998 9 Feb-3 May, India, Mumbai, Sir Caswasjee Jahangir Hall, The Enduring Image
    1997 13 Oct-1998 5 Jan, India, New Delhi, National Museum, The Enduring Image
    1995 Feb-Dec, Lisbon, Museu Nacional de Arqueologia, A Idade do Bronze Europeu

  • Conservation

    See treatments 

    Treatment date

    20 July 1994

    Treatment proposal

    Clean incised decoration for detailed study

    Condition

    White wax deposit over all of object and some dark deposit in some of the decoration.

    Treatment details

    Wax removed from some of the decoration using a bamboo skewer. Non decorated surface wipped with Industrial methylated spirits (ethanol,methanol) on Kimwipe tissue

    About these records 

  • Acquisition name

  • Acquisition date

    1900

  • Department

    Britain, Europe and Prehistory

  • Registration number

    1900,0727.1

Gold collar consisting of three tapering bars, fused at the ends.  A catch-plate, loosely attached by hooks at the end which pass through perforations, allows the collar to be taken on and off the neck.  The front segments of the bars carry incised geometric ornament divided into panels and fringed with a dog's tooth design. Attached at either side are two separately formed 'cups' of gold, each with an internal spike and moulding.

Gold collar consisting of three tapering bars, fused at the ends. A catch-plate, loosely attached by hooks at the end which pass through perforations, allows the collar to be taken on and off the neck. The front segments of the bars carry incised geometric ornament divided into panels and fringed with a dog's tooth design. Attached at either side are two separately formed 'cups' of gold, each with an internal spike and moulding.

Image description

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Object reference number: BCB65989

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