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tomb-painting

  • Object type

  • Museum number

    EA37977

  • Description

    Fragment of a polychrome tomb-painting representing Nebamun, standing in a small boat, fowling and fishing in the marshes, his wife stands behind and his daughter sits beneath, he holds a throw-stick in one hand and three decoy herons in the other, his cat is shown catching three of the numerous birds which have been startled from the papyrus-thicket, fish are shown beneath the water-line, lotus flowers with large and broad leaves grow in marsh to the right of the boat, bunch of lotuses hangs over his arm and another spray is held by his wife, the heads of the flowers are approximately triangular in shape, shown in profile with white petals framed by green and grey sepals, buds alternate regularly with open flowers, eight vertical registers of hieroglyphs remain.

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  • Culture/period

  • Date

    • 1350BC (circa)
  • Findspot

  • Materials

  • Technique

  • Dimensions

    • Height: 98 centimetres
    • Width: 115 centimetres
    • Thickness: 22 centimetres
    • Width: 98 centimetres (painting only)
  • Inscriptions

      • Inscription Type

        inscription
      • Inscription Script

        hieroglyphic
      • Inscription Comment

        Remains of eight vertical registers of hieroglyphs; seven polychrome and one black-painted.
  • Curator's comments

    Published:
    PM I Part 2, p. 817.
    Les Chats des Pharaons, Brussels 1989, p. 17 [II]
    P. Kozloff, B. Bryan, and M. Berman, Egypt's Dazzling Sun, Cleveland 1992, p. 299 [Pl.31] = Le Pharaon-Soleil, Paris 1993, p.238 [Fig.IX.23]. Miller and Parkinson in Davies, Colour and Painting, London 2001, p. 49, col. pl. 11 [1-4]. L.Manniche, in Strudwick and Taylor (eds): The Theban Necropolis, 2003, p. 45 [pl. 8];
    N. Strudwick, Masterpieces of Ancient Egypt, London 2006, pp. 170-3.
    Full publication: R. Parkinson, The Painted Tomb-Chapel of Nebamun: Masterpieces of Ancient Egyptian Art in the British Museum (London: British Museum Press 2008).
    A. Middleton and K. Uprichard (ed.), The Nebamun Wall paintings: Conservation, Scientific Analysis and Display at the British Museum (London: Archetype 2008).

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  • Bibliography

    • Rawson 1984 fig. 177 bibliographic details
    • Strudwick 2006 p.170 bibliographic details
    • Shaw & Nicholson 1995 p135 bibliographic details
  • Location

    G61/2F

  • Condition

    good (incomplete)

  • Conservation

    See treatments 

  • Associated names

  • Acquisition name

  • Acquisition date

    1821

  • Department

    Ancient Egypt & Sudan

  • BM/Big number

    EA37977

  • Registration number

    .37977

  • Additional IDs

    • ES.170
Fragment of a polychrome tomb-painting representing Nebamun, standing in a small boat, fowling and fishing in the marshes, his wife stands behind and his daughter sits beneath, he holds a throw-stick in one hand and three decoy herons in the other, his cat is shown catching three of the numerous birds which have been startled from the papyrus-thicket, fish are shown beneath the water-line, eight vertical registers of hieroglyphs remain.

Fragment of a polychrome tomb-painting representing Nebamun, standing in a small boat, fowling and fishing in the marshes, his wife stands behind and his daughter sits beneath, he holds a throw-stick in one hand and three decoy herons in the other, his cat is shown catching three of the numerous birds which have been startled from the papyrus-thicket, fish are shown beneath the water-line, eight vertical registers of hieroglyphs remain.

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Object reference number: YCA60905

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