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shabti

  • Object type

  • Museum number

    EA55483

  • Description

    Calcite shabti of Taharqo: of exceptionally large size. The reliance on older models is apparent in the text of the shabti spell, inscribed around the king's body. It is based on much earlier versions, with unusually full wording in place of the abbreviated texts that had been in fashion in the Third Intermediate Period.

    More 

  • Authority

  • Culture/period

  • Date

    • 690BC-664BC
  • Findspot

  • Materials

  • Technique

  • Dimensions

    • Height: 33.5 centimetres
  • Inscriptions

      • Inscription Type

        inscription
      • Inscription Script

        hieroglyphic
      • Inscription Comment

        Incised.
  • Curator's comments

    Bibliography:
    D. Dunham, ‘The Royal Cemeteries of Kush’ II (Boston 1950-1963);
    D. Dunham, 'Nuri' (Boston, 1955), 10, fig. 197, pl. CXL;
    J.H. Taylor and N.C. Strudwick, Mummies: Death and the Afterlife in Ancient Egypt. Treasures from The British Museum, Santa Ana and London 2005, pp. 230-1, pl. on p. 230.

    More 

  • Bibliography

    • Taylor & Strudwick 2005 p.230-231 bibliographic details
  • Exhibition history

    Exhibited:

    2005-2008, California, The Bowers Museum, Death and Afterlife in Ancient Egypt
    2011 Jul–Sept, Newcastle, Great North Museum, Pharaoh: King of Egypt
    2012 Oct–Jan, Dorchester, Dorset County Museum, Pharaoh: King of Egypt
    2012 Feb–June, Leeds City Museum, Pharaoh: King of Egypt
    2013, 25 Oct- 2014, 15 Feb, Wuhan, Hubei Provincial Museum, Pharaoh: King of Egypt, PROMISED
    2012 Jul-Oct, Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery, Pharaoh: King of Egypt
    2012 Nov– Feb 2013, Glasgow, Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum, Pharaoh: King of Egypt
    2013 Mar–Aug, Bristol Museum and Art Gallery , Pharaoh: King of Egypt
    [Theme: Adopting Royal Traditions]

  • Condition

    good

  • Conservation

    See treatments 

    Treatment date

    5 July 1991

    Reason for treatment

    Permanent Exhibition

    Treatment proposal

    Remove number from front and re-apply to back. Light clean. Surface colour fillet and paint base.

    Condition

    The stone is in sound condition and free from active decay. The surface is rather dirty. The museum number is painted directly across the chest of the object. The base is painted a dirty blue.

    Treatment details

    The surface of the object was cleaned with distilled water/white spirit and synperonic N on cotton wool swabs. This was rinsed with acetone on cotton wool swabs.

    The museum number was removed with acetone on cotton wool swabs and paited on the back with acrylic paints. The base was re-painted using matt vinyl emulsion.

    About these records 

  • Associated names

  • Acquisition name

  • Acquisition date

    1922

  • Department

    Ancient Egypt & Sudan

  • BM/Big number

    EA55483

  • Registration number

    1922,0513.74

Calcite shabti of Taharka: of exceptionally large size. The reliance on older models is apparent in the text of the shabti spell, inscribed around the king's body. It is based on much earlier versions, with unusually full wording in place of the abbreviated texts that had been in fashion in the Third Intermediate Period.

Calcite shabti of Taharka: of exceptionally large size. The reliance on older models is apparent in the text of the shabti spell, inscribed around the king's body. It is based on much earlier versions, with unusually full wording in place of the abbreviated texts that had been in fashion in the Third Intermediate Period.

Image description

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Object reference number: YCA65594

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