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bust

  • Object type

  • Museum number

    EA1198

  • Description

    Limestone bust of Muteminet: finely carved bust incised with three columns of text. The main text bears a dedication to the sistrum-player of Amun, Mut, and Khons, Muteminet. The back is roughly finished. The bust has been severely damaged at the base and back with much loss of the stone surface. There are a few gouges on the body and face. There are slight traces of black in the in hieroglyph in the central column of the text.

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  • Culture/period

  • Findspot

  • Materials

  • Technique

  • Dimensions

    • Height: 51 centimetres
    • Width: 26 centimetres
    • Thickness: 29 centimetres
  • Curator's comments

    A parallel bust of Pendjerti, husband of Muteminet, has been discovered in the tomb of their son Amenmose, no. 373 at Thebes. There can be no doubt that this bust was one of a pair from that tomb. The royal scribe Amenmose is attested on several monuments and flourished in the reign of Rameses II (L. Habachi in 'Studies in Honor of George R. Hughes' (Chicago, 1976), 83-103.

    Bibliography:
    The British Museum, 'A guide to the Egyptian galleries (Sculpture)', (London, 1909), 238
    (no. 871);
    L. Habachi in 'Studies in Honor of George R. Hughes' (Chicago, 1976),85-6;
    'The Luxor Museum of Ancient Art Catalogue' (Cairo, 1979), 150;
    K. A. Kitchen, 'Ramesside inscriptions : translated & annotated Translations Vol.3, Ramesses II, his contemporaries' (Oxford, 2000), 216;
    B. Porter & R. Moss, 'Topographical Bibliography of Ancient Egyptian Hieroglyphic Texts, Reliefs and Paintings' I (2) (Oxford: Clarendon Press), 790;
    M.A. Corzo, 'Nefertari Luce d'Egitto' (Rome, 1994), p. 175 [42];
    K-J Seyfried, 'Das Grab des Amonmose' (TT 373) (Mainz, 1990), 296, 299, 304, fig. 187.

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  • Bibliography

    • Taylor 2010 no. 42 bibliographic details
    • Bierbrier 1993 Pl.24-25 bibliographic details
  • Exhibition history

    Exhibited:

    2005-2006 Oct-Feb, Houston Museum of Natural Sciences, Mummy: The Inside Story
    2006 7 Mar-6 Aug, Mobile (Alabama), Gulf Coast Exploreum Science Center, Mummy: The Inside Story
    2006-2007 6 Oct-18 Feb, Tokyo National Museum, Mummy: The Inside Story
    2007 17 Mar-17 Jun, Kobe City Museum, Mummy: The Inside Story
    2010 4th Nov-2011 6th March, Round Reading Room BM, Book of the Dead
    19th Nov 2011- 11 Mar 2012. Richmond , VA, Virginia museum of Fine Art. Mummy. The inside story.
    Mar - Oct 2012. Brisbane, Queensland Museum South Bank. Mummy: The Inside Story
    2012/3, Nov-Apr, Mumbai, CSMVS, Mummy: The Inside Story
    2013, Apr-Nov, Singapore, ArtScience Museum, Mummy: The Inside Story

  • Condition

    The bust has been severely damaged at the base and back with much loss of the stone surface. There are a few gouges on the body and face. There are slight traces of black in the in hieroglyph in the central column of the text.

  • Conservation

    See treatments 

  • Associated names

  • Acquisition date

    1897

  • Department

    Ancient Egypt & Sudan

  • BM/Big number

    EA1198

  • Registration number

    1897,0508.120


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Object reference number: YCA71848

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