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Taira no Kanemori 平 兼盛 / Hyakunin isshu uba ga etoki 百人一首姥がゑとき (One Hundred Poems by One Hundred Poets, Explained by the Nurse)

  • Object type

  • Museum number

    1951,0714,0.40

  • Title (object)

    • Taira no Kanemori 平 兼盛

    Title (series)

    • Hyakunin isshu uba ga etoki 百人一首姥がゑとき (One Hundred Poems by One Hundred Poets, Explained by the Nurse)
  • Description

    Sketch, block-ready preparatory drawing ('hanshita-e') for unpublished print. Poem by Taira no Kanemori, young samurai seeking advice from a roadside physiognomist. Ink on paper.

  • Producer name

  • Culture/period

  • Date

    • 1830s(late)
  • Production place

  • Materials

  • Technique

  • Dimensions

    • Height: 25.1 centimetres
    • Width: 37 centimetres
  • Inscriptions

      • Inscription Type

        inscription
      • Inscription Transliteration

        Shinoburedo / iro ni ide ni keri /wa ga koi wa / mono ya omou to / hito no tou made
      • Inscription Translation

        Even though I hide it, / it shows all over my face, / such is my longing, / so that people ask me / ‘What are you thinking about?’ (Trans. Joshua Mostow.)
  • Curator's comments

    Clark 2017

    Poem 40: Shinoburedo / iro ni ide ni keri /wa ga koi wa /
    mono ya omou to / hito no tou made (Even though I hide it,
    / it shows all over my face, / such is my longing, / so
    that people ask me / ‘What are you thinking about?’
    Trans. Joshua Mostow.)
    Kanemori’s poem was awarded first place in a poetry
    contest in ad 960, and it remained a favourite, due to
    the colloquial question introduced towards the end. In
    considering this poem, Hokusai seems to have recalled
    the popular belief that faces could reveal both states of
    mind and the future, if discerned by a practitioner of
    the art of physiognomy, or reading faces.
    Physiognomists (ninsōmi) set up booths where travellers
    could have their fortune told, and here a young samurai
    presents himself for inspection by an expert who holds
    up a large magnifying glass. The samurai’s entourage
    – baggage-handlers, retainers and others – stretch along
    the road, awaiting the expert’s verdict. Hokusai treated
    this potentially humorous subject with empathy.

    More 

  • Bibliography

    • Clark 2017 141 bibliographic details
    • Hizo Ukiyo-e taikan Vol 3 51(b/w) bibliographic details
  • Location

    Not on display

  • Subjects

  • Acquisition name

  • Acquisition date

    1951

  • Department

    Asia

  • Registration number

    1951,0714,0.40

  • Additional IDs

    • Jap.Ptg.Add.353 (Japanese Painting Additional Number)
Sketch. General subject - figure. People by pavilion,design for an unpublished print. Ink on paper.

Sketch. General subject - figure. People by pavilion,design for an unpublished print. Ink on paper.

Image description

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Object reference number: JCF7194

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