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To celebrate Vikings Live, we have replaced our Roman alphabet with the runic alphabet used by the Vikings, the Scandinavian ‘Younger Futhark’. The ‘Younger Futhark’ has only 16 letters, so we have used some of the runic letters more than once or combined two runes for one Roman letter.

For an excellent introduction to runes, we recommend Martin Findell’s book published by British Museum Press.

More information about how we have ‘runified’ this site

 

Time


Longcase clock by Ahasuerus Fr

How the clock works

How the clock works


Height: 193.000 cm

M&ME CAI 2099


'Time' is a strange thing. You can't see it or feel it, but it's still always passing, even when there are no clocks to show it. This is because time has always existed, even before watches and clocks had been invented. Hundreds of years ago, although people probably didn't need to know the time as precisely as we do now, they still wanted to know when to meet their friends or when a day's work was done. As they couldn't look at their clock or watch, they looked around them instead, and worked out the time from the movement of the sun and stars, or other objects in the natural world.

This is a tour of ten objects in The British Museum which show you some of the ways that people in the past have told the time.

Print and do activity

Time Quiz (39Kb)