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To celebrate Vikings Live, we have replaced our Roman alphabet with the runic alphabet used by the Vikings, the Scandinavian ‘Younger Futhark’. The ‘Younger Futhark’ has only 16 letters, so we have used some of the runic letters more than once or combined two runes for one Roman letter.

For an excellent introduction to runes, we recommend Martin Findell’s book published by British Museum Press.

More information about how we have ‘runified’ this site

 

Sceptre


Sceptre from Sutton Hoo

Sceptre

Elizabeth I holding her sceptre

Elizabeth I holding her sceptre

Grave field in winter

Grave field in winter


Length: 58.300 cm (whetstone)
Width: 5.100 cm (whetstone)
Diameter: 10.700 cm (ring)
Length: 58.300 cm (whetstone)
Height: 8.800 cm (pedestal)

Gift of Mrs E.M. Pretty

M&ME 1939,10-10,160;M&ME 1939,10-10,205


A sceptre is held by a king or queen on special occasions to show that they are royal. This has been the case for hundreds of years, and still happens today in many countries. Queen Elizabeth II held three different sceptres at her coronation.

The person buried at Sutton Hoo had a huge, very heavy sceptre. The main part of it is made of stone - actually a big whetstone, used to sharpen swords on. Maybe this is meant to show that his sword was always sharp. A stag, the king of the forest, is on the top.

On display: Room 2