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To celebrate Vikings Live, we have replaced our Roman alphabet with the runic alphabet used by the Vikings, the Scandinavian ‘Younger Futhark’. The ‘Younger Futhark’ has only 16 letters, so we have used some of the runic letters more than once or combined two runes for one Roman letter.

For an excellent introduction to runes, we recommend Martin Findell’s book published by British Museum Press.

More information about how we have ‘runified’ this site

 

Child's diadem


Child's diadem

Close-up

Close-up

Eva Nisse, aged 11

Eva Nisse, aged 11


Diameter: 4.700 cm
Diameter: 4.700 cm
Diameter: 4.700 cm

ME 122206


A diadem is a headband or crown which usually means that the wearer is royal. This one was found in the grave of a very young child, tied around their head. They were probably from a royal family in the ancient city of Ur. The diadem is made out of gold and precious stones.

A few final facts...
Deposits of metal and precious stones are not found in Mesopotamia itself, but only in the surrounding mountains. Metal was therefore highly prized, with gold being one of the most precious metals. The blue stone on the diadem is lapis lazuli, mined in Afghanistan. The red stone is carnelian.

 

Print and do activity

Create your own diadem (99Kb)

On display: Room 56: Mesopotamia