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To celebrate Vikings Live, we have replaced our Roman alphabet with the runic alphabet used by the Vikings, the Scandinavian ‘Younger Futhark’. The ‘Younger Futhark’ has only 16 letters, so we have used some of the runic letters more than once or combined two runes for one Roman letter.

For an excellent introduction to runes, we recommend Martin Findell’s book published by British Museum Press.

More information about how we have ‘runified’ this site

 

What did Nesperennub look like?


© 2004 Dr Caroline Wilkinson, University of Manchester

Nesperennub

Building up the face

Building up the face

Model of skull with pegs

Model of skull with pegs


The latest techniques have made it possible to reconstruct Nesperennub's living appearance. The CT scans were manipulated and used to create a full-size replica of his skull. Pegs were attached to the replica at specific points, indicating the depth of soft tissue usually present at those locations on the human head. With these pegs as reference-points, muscles, eyes and skin were modelled using clay and attached to the skull. Artificial colouring was then applied to the skin and eyes. The result, though not one hundred per cent accurate, probably provides a recognizable likeness.

What kind of life did this man have? The inscriptions on his cartonnage case reveal that Nesperennub and his father worked at Karnak. This was the cult-centre of the god Amun-Re, but Nesperennub was mainly associated with Khons, a very ancient god linked to the moon. An inscription on the roof-terrace of the temple of Khons records other titles held by Nesperennub: Fan-bearer on the right hand of Khons, and Fan-bearer on the right hand of the king. It also lists Nesperennub's ancestors, indicating that Nesperennub was a man of high status and part of an influential family.