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To celebrate Vikings Live, we have replaced our Roman alphabet with the runic alphabet used by the Vikings, the Scandinavian ‘Younger Futhark’. The ‘Younger Futhark’ has only 16 letters, so we have used some of the runic letters more than once or combined two runes for one Roman letter.

For an excellent introduction to runes, we recommend Martin Findell’s book published by British Museum Press.

More information about how we have ‘runified’ this site

 

London 1753


Louis Philippe Boitard, The Imports of Great Britain from France, 7 March 1757, etching with engraved lettering


The British Museum was founded in 1753, at a time when London was changing from being the capital of an emerging economy to the centre of a new empire. The mid-eighteenth century saw a number of significant national and international events. In 1746 the defeat of the Jacobite Rebellion at the battle of Culloden ended Stuart claims to the monarchy. In 1763 the end of the Seven Years' War left Britain in control of Canada, India and much of the Caribbean.

This tour looks at London during these crucial years through prints and drawings of the period. It is arranged in sections corresponding to five distinct London areas: the City, the River, Covent Garden and Bloomsbury, Westminster, St James's and Mayfair.

Illustration: Louis Philippe Boitard (lived about 1733-1767), The Imports of Great Britain from France, 7 March 1757, etching with engraved lettering, published by John Bowles and Son at the Black Horse, Cornhill (PD 1871-12-9-981; BM Satire 3653)