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To celebrate Vikings Live, we have replaced our Roman alphabet with the runic alphabet used by the Vikings, the Scandinavian ‘Younger Futhark’. The ‘Younger Futhark’ has only 16 letters, so we have used some of the runic letters more than once or combined two runes for one Roman letter.

For an excellent introduction to runes, we recommend Martin Findell’s book published by British Museum Press.

More information about how we have ‘runified’ this site

 

Man's winter outfit, made by Leonie Qrunnut


Mans winter outfit

Detail from the engraving Nakaho & His Wife Oomna after a drawing by G.F. Lyon (Parry 1824)

Detail from the engraving Nakaho & His Wife Oomna after a drawing by G.F. Lyon (Parry 1824)


AOA Ethno 1986.Am19.11;AOA Ethno 1986.Am10.14 (boots)


This man's winter outfit consists of an outer parka (qulittaq) and an inner parka (atigi), inner and outer trousers, several layers of footwear, and mittens. Except for the sealskin boots, all the garments are made of caribou skin.

In Igloolik, caribou was the most common material for making winter clothing. Caribou skin is very warm; the hair growth is twice as dense as on seal skin, and the hollow guard hairs enclose air that acts as insulation against the cold.

'Of course caribou skin was the only source of clothing that we could get when I was young. The textiles that were available to us were not good for winter wear. As a matter of fact, I do not consider them to be the type of material that you could use in winter. I am still like that; whenever I am wearing textiles, I have to put on layers and layers of clothing on my body and legs, and even at that it will not warm me up. This is because I am a real Inuit. I do not consider textiles warm clothing.'
Niomi Panikpakuttuk, 1996

Other view: detail from the engraving Nakaho & His Wife Oomna after a drawing by G.F. Lyon (Parry 1824), showing that around 1820, the parkas of men from Igloolik had long backflaps.