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To celebrate Vikings Live, we have replaced our Roman alphabet with the runic alphabet used by the Vikings, the Scandinavian ‘Younger Futhark’. The ‘Younger Futhark’ has only 16 letters, so we have used some of the runic letters more than once or combined two runes for one Roman letter.

For an excellent introduction to runes, we recommend Martin Findell’s book published by British Museum Press.

More information about how we have ‘runified’ this site

 

 

On display

Room 2: Highlights from the world of Sutton Hoo, AD 300–1100 

Object details

Length: 72.0 cm (blade)
Length: 85.4 cm (overall, including hilt)

1939,1010.95
Department of Britain, Europe and Prehistory

Gift of Mrs E.M. Pretty

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Sword from the Sutton Hoo ship burial

Anglo-Saxon, early 7th century AD
From Mound 1, Sutton Hoo, Suffolk, England

Anglo-Saxon sword blades were made using a technique known as pattern-welding, where rods of iron were twisted and then forged to form the core of a blade, to which sharp cutting edges were added. This method gave the blade an intricately patterned appearance resembling herringbone or snake-like markings. The sword-blade found in the Sutton Hoo ship burial is especially complex.

The sword is richly furnished with gold hilt (handle) fittings. The pommel is inlaid with garnet cloisonné, the guards are made from gold plates, and the grip has two gold mounts decorated with delicate filigree. Worn patches on the sword’s pommel were probably caused by the owner’s hand or clothing rubbing it when the sword was sheathed at his side. The sword was buried in a wooden scabbard bound in leather and lined with sheep wool, whose oil kept the blade bright. Two button-shaped mounts and two pyramid-shaped fittings, also gold with garnet inlays, were associated with the scabbard.

The sword hung from a belt whose fittings are equally magnificent. All are made of gold with inlaid garnet cloisonné. One of these, the T-shaped strap distributor, is made of three moving parts. On the back of one mount are the marks of a tiny goldsmith’s hammer where a repair has been made. The sword belt buckle is the only piece of ‘jewellery’ found in this extraordinary grave that is damaged – it lay beneath the blade and was crushed when the burial chamber collapsed.


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References

G. Williams, Treasures from Sutton Hoo, (London, British Museum Press, 2011)

A.C. Evans, The Sutton Hoo ship burial, revised edition (London, The British Museum Press, 1994)

R.L.S. Bruce-Mitford, The Sutton Hoo ship burial-2, vol. 2: arms, armour and regalia, (London, The British Museum Press, 1978)