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Nebamun hunting in the marshes, fragment of a scene from the tomb-chapel of Nebamun

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Height: 83.000 cm
Width: 98.000 cm
Thickness: 22.000 cm

Salt Collection

EA 37977

Room 61: Tomb-chapel Nebamun

    Nebamun hunting in the marshes, fragment of a scene from the tomb-chapel of Nebamun

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    Nebamun hunting in the marshes, fragment of a scene from the tomb-chapel of Nebamun

    Thebes, Egypt
    Late 18th Dynasty, around 1350 BC

    Fowling in the marshes

    Nebamun is shown hunting birds, in a small boat with his wife Hatshepsut and their young daughter, in the marshes of the Nile. Such scenes had already been traditional parts of tomb-chapel decoration for hundreds of years and show the dead tomb-owner ‘enjoying himself and seeing beauty’, as the hieroglyphic caption here says.

    This is more than a simple image of recreation. Fertile marshes were seen as a place of rebirth and eroticism. Hunting animals could represent Nebamun’s triumph over the forces of nature as he was reborn. The huge striding figure of Nebamun dominates, forever happy and forever young, surrounded by the rich and varied life of the marsh.

    There was originally another half of the scene, which showed Nebamun spearing fish. This half of the wall is lost, apart from two old photographs of small fragments of Nebamun and his young son. The painters have captured the scaly and shiny quality of the fish.

    A tawny cat catches birds among the papyrus stems. Cats were family pets, but he is shown here because a cat could also represent the Sun-god hunting the enemies of light and order. His unusual gilded eye hints at the religious meanings of this scene.

    The artists have filled every space with lively details. The marsh is full of lotus flowers and Plain Tiger butterflies. They are freely and delicately painted, suggesting the pattern and texture of their wings.

    M. Hooper, The Tomb of Nebamun (London, British Museum Press, 2007)

    R. Parkinson, The painted Tomb-chapel of Nebamun. (London, British Museum Press, 2008)

    A. Middleton and K. Uprichard, (eds.), The Nebamun Wall Paintings: Conservation, Scientific Analysis and Display at the British Museum (London, Archetype, 2008)

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    On display: Room 61: Tomb-chapel Nebamun

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