What just happened?

To celebrate Vikings Live, we have replaced our Roman alphabet with the runic alphabet used by the Vikings, the Scandinavian ‘Younger Futhark’. The ‘Younger Futhark’ has only 16 letters, so we have used some of the runic letters more than once or combined two runes for one Roman letter.

For an excellent introduction to runes, we recommend Martin Findell’s book published by British Museum Press.

More information about how we have ‘runified’ this site

 

Money
The Citi Money
Gallery

Room 68

From prehistory
to the present day

Impressions of nations

Coins from United Nations member states

Countries often use images on their coins and banknotes to make statements about their identity. The countries that are member states of the United Nations do not all have their own currencies. Some are part of monetary unions, while others, often small countries, use the money of a larger neighbour. Some countries do not issue coins for circulation and almost exclusively use paper money, although they may produce special issues for collectors.


*"The Central Bank of Chile as issuer of the Chilean legal money in circulation and as holder
of the intellectual property rights on the images and designs of the coins and banknotes of its
own emission, hereby gives the British Museum the corresponding permission to diffuse
images of the Chilean coins, within the terms and conditions established in the Bank’s Board
Resolution No.1583 of December 30th, 2010 and its regulations. Concerning coins it is
advisable to have in mind the recommendations established in paragraph 2 of the above
mentioned Resolution 1583 and its regulations, since their reproductions will be diffused by
means of electronic, digital or audiovisual devices."

**This coin is no longer in circulation.