What just happened?

To celebrate Vikings Live, we have replaced our Roman alphabet with the runic alphabet used by the Vikings, the Scandinavian ‘Younger Futhark’. The ‘Younger Futhark’ has only 16 letters, so we have used some of the runic letters more than once or combined two runes for one Roman letter.

For an excellent introduction to runes, we recommend Martin Findell’s book published by British Museum Press.

More information about how we have ‘runified’ this site

 

The nef

Young people from Coram learn about the nef, a mechanical galleon made over 400 years ago in Germany for an emperor. British Museum curators David Thompson and Ollie Cook debate its life from why it was made to what it means to them.

Related playlists

Downloads

The Nef

Download this video to watch in your favourite media player, or to view this video online please enable javascript.

Using this on a mobile device? Tap the image to watch.
On desktop, requires Flash player or click image to download.

Playlist

 

Ain Sakhri lovers figurine

What makes an object art?
Play video 

 

The Great Wave

How does a nineteenth century Japanese print connect with our world today?
Play video 

 

Throne of Weapons

What happens when weapons are transformed into art?
Play video 

 

Jade terrapin

Should beautiful objects be admired for their beauty alone?
Play video 

 

Swimming reindeer

How can a 13,000 year old carving connect with us today?
Play video 

 

Sikh fortress turban

Young people from the Sikh Educational Council explore the story of the turban
Play video 

 

Ife head

What does this sculpture from west Africa mean today?
Play video 

 

The Museum as object

Is the British Museum an object or a just a building full of objects?
Play video 

 

The nef, a mechanical galleon

A clock? A work of art? Why was the nef built and what was it meant to represent?
Play video 

 

Sowei mask

Exploring a mask from Sierra Leone
Play video