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To celebrate Vikings Live, we have replaced our Roman alphabet with the runic alphabet used by the Vikings, the Scandinavian ‘Younger Futhark’. The ‘Younger Futhark’ has only 16 letters, so we have used some of the runic letters more than once or combined two runes for one Roman letter.

For an excellent introduction to runes, we recommend Martin Findell’s book published by British Museum Press.

More information about how we have ‘runified’ this site

 

Rock crystal skull

Large quartz crystal skulls have generated great interest and fascination since they began to surface in public and private collections, during the second half of the nineteenth century. Some of them have been attributed to the work of ancient Mexica, Mixtec or even Maya stone workers in Mexico. Others are said to be examples of colonial Mexican art, for use in churches, perhaps as bases for crucifixes.

Related playlists

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Playlist

 

Colossal bust of Ramesses II

One of the largest pieces of Egyptian sculpture in the British Museum.
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Giant sculpture of a scarab beetle

This diorite sculpture, at around one and a half metres long, is one of the largest representations known.
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Tree of Life

The Tree of Life was made by four Mozambican artists: Cristovao Canhavato (Kester), Hilario Nhatugueja, Fiel dos Santos and Adelino Serafim Maté.
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The Atomic Apocalypse, by the Linares family

The celebration of the festivals of All Saints and All Souls.
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The Rosetta Stone

A valuable key to the decipherment of hieroglyphs.
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Kozo, the double-headed dog

Kongo carvers produced wooden carvings (minkisi, singular: nkisi) which were used in rituals.
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