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To celebrate Vikings Live, we have replaced our Roman alphabet with the runic alphabet used by the Vikings, the Scandinavian ‘Younger Futhark’. The ‘Younger Futhark’ has only 16 letters, so we have used some of the runic letters more than once or combined two runes for one Roman letter.

For an excellent introduction to runes, we recommend Martin Findell’s book published by British Museum Press.

More information about how we have ‘runified’ this site

 

Music of Afghanistan:
Herati song tune Mui Talai

Mui Talai belongs to the repertoire of traditional Herati music . The songbirds that can be heard in the recording were brought along to the recording session at a Herati hotel by the musicians.

Rahim Khushnawaz (rubab), Naim Khushnawaz (tabla).

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Music of Afghanistan: Herati song tune Mui Talai

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All Afghanistan exhibition video and audio

 

Introduction to the exhibition

Aghanistan: Crossroads of the Ancient World.

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Hidden treasures

The extraordinary story of how Afghanistan's treasures were hidden from danger.

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The Greek legacy

The lasting influence of Alexander the Great in Afghanistan.

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Returning ivories

The remarkable story of conservation and repatriation of the Begram Ivories.

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Installing the crown

A gold crown found in the tomb of a nomadic woman is put on display.

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Opening ceremony

Afghanistan's president, Hamid Karzai, is joined by Foreign Secretary William Hague.

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Glass blowing

Watch the creation of a fish-shaped vessel – the first time anyone has tried to make it.
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Music of Afghanistan

Afghanistan is home to a variety of regional music characteristic of the ethnic groups inhabiting the different parts of the country. Professor John Baily and Veronica Doubleday lived in Herat during the 1970s in order to research and record the music of the city and surrounding rural areas.