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To celebrate Vikings Live, we have replaced our Roman alphabet with the runic alphabet used by the Vikings, the Scandinavian ‘Younger Futhark’. The ‘Younger Futhark’ has only 16 letters, so we have used some of the runic letters more than once or combined two runes for one Roman letter.

For an excellent introduction to runes, we recommend Martin Findell’s book published by British Museum Press.

More information about how we have ‘runified’ this site

 

Discoveries and re-evaluations: painting practices under the microscope

UCL lunch hour lecture on tour at the British Museum. Libby Sheldon, UCL Art History.

Paintings are not always what they seem to be on the surface. Technical investigation, particularly of pigments, has revealed not only surprising differences between the present and the original appearance of works, but also the use of unexpected ingredients for certain effects.

Recognising the changes to colouring as well as identifying materials can lead to re-evaluation of both the meaning and sometimes the date and attribution of images.

This talk with Libby Sheldon, UCL Art History, uncovers the practices of artists as different as Hilliard and Reynolds, highlighting those of Elizabethan portraitists in the lifetime of Shakespeare. It also asks what this new information means.

UCL lunch hour lectures will be available to watch live online at ucl.ac.uk/lhl/streamed 

Blog post from previous UCL lunch hour lecture: At Home with the Neanderthals 

This event took place on 28 June 2012.

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Discoveries and re-evaluations: painting practices under the microscope

Libby Sheldon, UCL Art History, uncovers the practices of artists as different as Hilliard and Reynolds, highlighting those of Elizabethan portraitists in the lifetime of Shakespeare.
Play audio 

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A book by any other name would smell as sweet

Dr Matija Strlic, UCL Centre for Sustainable Heritage, will discuss how sniffing objects can thus reveal crucial information, and how smell is also part of an object’s history and part of how we enjoy our heritage.
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Virtual visitors: why would anyone want to visit the virtual British Museum collections online?

Melissa Terras, UCL Centre for Digital Humanities, will discuss what is known about the use of this virtual online resource, and if indeed it is even used.
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30 years and still counting: slowing the spread of HIV in a complex world

This lecture looks at the successes and failures of HIV prevention and explores the social, economic and technical challenges involved in slowing its future spread.
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A climate of fear: what the past tells us about human responses to climate change

Dr Joe Flatman uses a series of objects from the British Museum to explore what the past tells us about human responses to climate change.
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