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To celebrate Vikings Live, we have replaced our Roman alphabet with the runic alphabet used by the Vikings, the Scandinavian ‘Younger Futhark’. The ‘Younger Futhark’ has only 16 letters, so we have used some of the runic letters more than once or combined two runes for one Roman letter.

For an excellent introduction to runes, we recommend Martin Findell’s book published by British Museum Press.

More information about how we have ‘runified’ this site

 

Behind the scenes
Displaying, researching and understanding
the collection

Excavation in Amara West, Sudan

Our work

More than six million people pass through the doors of the British Museum every year to view the galleries, take in temporary exhibitions, participate in events or just to spend a few moments in one of London’s most spectacular public buildings. Working behind the scenes to make these visits possible are more than 1,000 members of staff, from cleaners, curators and conservators to security, scientists and the schools team.

Exhibitions

Afghanistan: crossroads of the ancient world

Curators St John Simpson and Constance Wyndham write about the exhibition Afghanistan: crossroads of the ancient world on the British Museum blog.

Ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead

Exhibition curator John Taylor explains how he uncovered the stories of these ancient volumes of spells for the afterlife.
What is a Book of the dead
Afterlife admin

 

Archaeology

Unearthing an ancient town in Sudan

A team of researchers led by British Museum curator Neal Spencer spends six weeks every winter excavating the ancient Egyptian town of Amara West in what is now Sudan.
Read about the recent dig season

Getting to the bottom of the cauldrons

In 2003 a large collection of Iron Age cauldrons was found in a field in Wiltshire. British Museum, conservators Alexandra Baldwin and Jamie Hood are working with curator Jody Joy to uncover the stories they can tell us about life in Britain 2,500 years ago.

 

Conservation

A year of studying in Shanghai

Learning the art of Chinese painting conservation takes 10 years. Read about the final year of Valentina Marabini's training, which she is undertaking at Shanghai Museum.
Read the latest post

Unravelling the Norwich shroud

Museum conservators and curators, unwrap and decipher an ancient Egyptian shroud from the collection of Norwich Castle Museum.