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To celebrate Vikings Live, we have replaced our Roman alphabet with the runic alphabet used by the Vikings, the Scandinavian ‘Younger Futhark’. The ‘Younger Futhark’ has only 16 letters, so we have used some of the runic letters more than once or combined two runes for one Roman letter.

For an excellent introduction to runes, we recommend Martin Findell’s book published by British Museum Press.

More information about how we have ‘runified’ this site

 

Africa Programme

Sustainable and
dynamic initiatives 
for exchange and 
skills sharing

Supported by:

Ford Foundation

Ghana

The British Museum works with a range of partners in national, regional and independent museums across Ghana to share skills, expertise and knowledge.

Since 2007 the Africa Programme has organised more than 12 in-country training workshops focusing on core activities such as collections care, documentation and display. This programme enables the participants to implement positive changes in their own museums, generating confidence and building new practical skills.

Current Partners

 
Map of Ghana

Map of Ghana showing the locations
of partner organisations

 

Current projects

 

Getting interactive in Ghana

As part of the Africa Programme’s strong relationship with Ghana, the latest in a series of dynamic workshops for museum professionals was held in Kumasi during March 2013. Participants from across the city were joined by colleagues from Ho, Legon and Ntonso.

The workshop focused on interactive educational techniques and built on the knowledge and skills base developed over the last few years. At the end of the week, local school students were able to experience new thematic tours that explored the historic fort building and fascinating collections of the Ghana Armed Forces Museum.

Partners have also been making use of their special teaching collections, created during a previous workshop, as part of the ongoing development of their educational provision. Outreach sessions in local schools use carefully selected handling objects to teach Ghanaian archaeology, Asante arts and culture, and aspects of army life.



Past projects

 

Preserving Ghana’s cultural heritage

A strong partnership developed over the past two years with the Armed Forces Museum (AFM) has established an excellent model for learning and exchange. This centrally located museum in Kumase is housed in the only inland fort in Ghana.

A series of structured workshops with participants drawn from the different partners has transformed some key displays and work continues on the documentation and digitisation of important historical collections of objects and photographs.

This successful collaboration would not have been possible without the dedication and hard work of the museum staff, the inspiring leadership of the curator and major support and encouragement from senior officers of the Northern Command.


 

Celebrating the Fabric of a Nation

A pioneering project undertaken by staff from the Africa Programme working in partnership with the Department of Archaeology (now the Department of Archaeology and Heritage Studies) at the University of Ghana, Legon to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Ghanaian independence in 2007.

This collaborative research project sourced two collections of printed textiles, one for each institution, which were displayed in complementary exhibitions at the British Museum and at the University of Ghana. The exhibition installation in Ghana was supported by an Africa Programme training workshop for University staff and students.

The British Museum version of The Fabric of a Nation subsequently travelled to six venues across the UK as part of the Museum in the UK programme ending its tour at Brent Museum in north London. The displays of beautiful wax and ‘fancy’ cloths inspired community projects and supported activities for visitors of all ages.

Find out more

Museum in the UK 
Africa Programme: London and the UK