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To celebrate Vikings Live, we have replaced our Roman alphabet with the runic alphabet used by the Vikings, the Scandinavian ‘Younger Futhark’. The ‘Younger Futhark’ has only 16 letters, so we have used some of the runic letters more than once or combined two runes for one Roman letter.

For an excellent introduction to runes, we recommend Martin Findell’s book published by British Museum Press.

More information about how we have ‘runified’ this site

 

Quanyu Wang

Contact

+44 (0)20 7323 8981
science@thebritishmuseum.ac.uk  

Quanyu Wang undertakes research and investigation into the deterioration, conservation and technology of non-precious metal and provides scientific services within the aims of the Museum.

As a member of the science teams she co-ordinates the development of new projects within the Museum and participates in the development of research collaborations with external museums and higher education partners. She has co-supervised an AHRC PhD project with Cardiff University on the desalination of archaeological iron: Archaeological iron in the British Museum.

She gained her BSc and MSc in ceramic materials from Tsinghua University, Beijing, China, and a PhD in archaeometallurgy from University College London, UK. Her research interests are the technology and conservation of archaeological metals.

Quanyu’s previous employment included a lectureship at Peking University, China and a research fellowship at the Smithsonian Institution and Sheffield University. Her recent research projects include the deterioration of Jin bronzes from China and casting experiments with archaeologically relevant tin bronzes.

Current projects

Technical study of Chiseldon cauldrons, focusing on iron and copper alloy
Chiseldon Cauldrons research project

Technical study of Chinese bronzes in the British Museum collection

Compositional analysis of pre-Qin coins in the British Museum collection

Scientific analysis of Bronze Age shields in the British Museum collection

Scientific analysis of 19th - 20th century Balkan white metal jewellery

Tests of Crios (R) foam as a pollutant scavenger used in showcases and storage

Previous projects

Studies of deterioration and preservation of archaeological iron

A study of microstructure and corrosion of untreated small bronze objects from Saqqara, Egypt

Metalworking technology of iron spearheads from Sutton Hoo

Deterioration and electrolytic reduction of archaeolological lead

Metalwork from Kiev - technical study

External fellowships/ honorary positions/ membership of professional bodies

Member of The Historical Metallurgy Society (HMS)

Member of the Archaeological Iron After Excavation (AIAE), sub working group of the International Committee of Museums (ICOM)

Recent publications

Q. Wang, 2012. Technical Studies of Three Gui Vessels of the Early Western Zhou period in the British Museum Collection, in P. Jett, B. McCarthy and J.G. Douglas (eds.), Scientific Research on Ancient Asian Metallurgy, Proceedings of the Fifth Forbes Symposium at the Freer Gallery of Art, London: Archetype Publication Ltd. 63-72.

Q. Wang, S. Priewe, K. Chen, and S. La Niece, 2011. A Chinese bronze gui vessel: genuine Western Zhou object or fake? The British Museum Technical Research Bulletin 5, 59-66.

S. La Niece and Q. Wang, ‘Scientific study of the silver jewellery and ingots from the Kiev hoard of 1906 in the British Museum collection’, in L. Pekarska (ed.), Jewellery of Princely Kiev, the Kiev Hoards in the British Museum and the Metropolitan Museum of Art and Related Material. Mainz. London: Römisch-Germanisches Zentralmuseum and the British Museum, 2011, 67-77.

Q. Wang, H. Huang, and F. Shearman, ‘Bronzes from the Sacred Animal Necropolis at Saqqara, Egypt: a study of the metals and corrosion, The British Museum Technical Research Bulletin, 3, 2009, 73-82.

Q. Wang and J. Mei, ‘Some Observations on recent studies of bronze casting technology in ancient China, in T. K. Kienlin and B. W. Roberts (eds.), Metals and Societies, Studies in honour of Barbara S. Ottaway.  Universitätsforschungen zur prähistorischen Archäologie. Bonn: Habelt, 2009, 383-391.

Q. Wang, S. Dove, F. Shearman, and M. Smirniou, ‘Evaluation of methods of chloride ion concentration determination and effectiveness of desalination treatments using sodium hydroxide and alkaline sulphite solutions’, The Conservator, 31, 2008, 67-74.

R. J. H. Clark, Q. Wang, and A. Correia, ‘Can the Raman spectrum of anatase in artwork and archaeology be used for dating purposes? Identification by Raman microscopy of anatase in decorative coatings on Neolithic (Yangshao) pottery from Henan, China’, J. of Archaeological Science, 34 (11), 2007, 1787-1793.

Representative articles

Q. Wang, ‘An investigation of deterioration of archaeological iron’, Studies in Conservation, 52 (2), 2007, 125-134.

Q. Wang and B. S. Ottaway, Casting Experiments and Microstructure of Archaeologically Relevant Bronzes. BAR International Series 1331. (Oxford, Archaeopress, 2004).

Q. Wang and J. Mei, ‘Some Observations on recent studies of bronze casting technology in ancient China, in T. K. Kienlin and B. W. Roberts (eds.), Metals and Societies, Studies in honour of Barbara S. Ottaway.  Universitätsforschungen zur prähistorischen Archäologie. Bonn: Habelt, 2009, 383-391.

Q. Wang, Metalworking technology and deterioration of Jin bronzes from the Tianma-Qucun site, Shanxi, China. BAR International Series 1023,  (Oxford, Archaeopress, 2002)

Q. Wang and J.F. Merkel, ‘Studies on the redeposition of copper in Jin bronzes from Tianma-Qucun, Shanxi, China’, Studies in Conservation, 46(4), 2001, 242-250.