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To celebrate Vikings Live, we have replaced our Roman alphabet with the runic alphabet used by the Vikings, the Scandinavian ‘Younger Futhark’. The ‘Younger Futhark’ has only 16 letters, so we have used some of the runic letters more than once or combined two runes for one Roman letter.

For an excellent introduction to runes, we recommend Martin Findell’s book published by British Museum Press.

More information about how we have ‘runified’ this site

 

Eleanor Blakelock

Contact

+44 (0)20 7323 8794
eblakelock@thebritishmuseum.ac.uk   

Eleanor's main responsibility while working at the British Museum is to study the Staffordshire Hoard.

This will involve analysis of the metal that the hoard is constructed from, and with a larger research team starting to answer questions about how the pieces were constructed, their origins and when it was deposited.

Prior to the British Museum, Eleanor's PhD research was carried out at Bradford University where she studied iron knives and iron technology in the Anglo-Saxon and Viking periods, in Britain and Ireland. She also has an interest in general ironworking sites and residues, and also in experimental reconstruction of iron making furnaces.

Current projects

Studying the Staffordshire Hoard

External fellowships/ honorary positions/ membership of professional bodies

Council Member of Historical Metallurgy Society

Chair of Members, Publicity and Programme Committee for the Historical Metallurgy Society

Honorary Associate Researcher at Institute of Archaeology, UCL

Recent Publications

McDonnell, G., Blakelock, E.S., Rubinson, S.R., Chabot, N., Daoust, A.B. and Castagnino, V. 2012. The iron economy of Saxon Wharram Percy: modelling the Saxon iron working landscape. In Wrathmell, S. (ed.) Wharram. A study of Settlement on the Yorkshire Wolds, XIII. A History of Wharram Percy and its Neighbours. York: York University Archaeological Publications.

Blakelock, E.S. 2012. Cutting Edge of Technology: How the archaeometallurgical analysis of iron knives provides an understanding of the nature of iron technology in past societies. Archaeological Review from Cambridge. 66-84.

Blakelock, E.S. and McDonnell, G. 2011. Early medieval knife manufacture in Britain: a comparison between rural and urban settlements (AD 400-1000). In Hošek, J., Cleere, H. and Mihok, L. (eds) The Archaeometallurgy of Iron: recent developments in archaeological and scientific research. Prague: Institute of Archaeology ASCR Prague. 123-136.

Blakelock, E. S., M. Martinón-Torres, H.A. Veldhuijzen & T. Young. 2009. Slag Inclusions and the Quest for Provenance: an experiment and case study. Journal of Archaeological Science 36: 1745-1757.

Stern, B., J. Connan, E. Blakelock, R. Jackman, R. A. E. Coningham & C. Heron 2008. From Susa to Anuradhapura: Reconstructing aspects of trade and exchange in bitumen-coated ceramic vessels between Iran and Sri Lanka from the Third to the Ninth Centuries AD. Archaeometry 50: 409-428.

Blakelock, E. & G. McDonnell 2007. A Review of the Metallographic Analysis of Early Medieval Knives. Historical Metallurgy 41(1): 40-56.