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To celebrate Vikings Live, we have replaced our Roman alphabet with the runic alphabet used by the Vikings, the Scandinavian ‘Younger Futhark’. The ‘Younger Futhark’ has only 16 letters, so we have used some of the runic letters more than once or combined two runes for one Roman letter.

For an excellent introduction to runes, we recommend Martin Findell’s book published by British Museum Press.

More information about how we have ‘runified’ this site

 

Sascha Priewe

Curator, Chinese collections,
Co-ordinating curator, Korean collections

Department: Asia

Contact

+44 (0)20 7323 8431

spriewe@britishmuseum.org

Sascha Priewe joined the British Museum in 2009. He is a curator in the Department of Asia, where his responsibilities include the ancient Chinese collections, in particular metalwork, sculpture and jade, and the Korean collections.

Sascha completed his DPhil in Archaeology at Merton College, University of Oxford, in 2012.

His main research interest is Chinese archaeology with a particular focus on the archaeology of Neolithic and Bronze Age China, specifically issues of interaction and exchange as well as religion and ritual. Further research interests include the archaeology of the Northern and Southern, Sui and Tang dynasties, and the formation and display of East Asian (archaeological) collections, and issues in the field of museum studies.

Current projects

  • Korea Foundation Gallery Refreshment Project, completion in December 2014, and major Korean public programme in 2015
  • Chinese bronze mirrors in the British Museum and Royal Ontario Museum
  • Publication of conference proceedings: Constructing East Asia’s Past: Early 20th Century Archaeological Collections in European Museums
  • Technical studies of ancient Chinese bronzes (with Quanyu Wang, Department of Conservation and Scientific Research)

Previous projects

  • Ritual and revelry: the art of drinking in Asia, exhibition co-curator (2012)
  • Contemporary Chinese seals by Li Lanqing, exhibition co-curator (2012)
  • Chinese Seals: Tradition and Innovation, conference co-organiser (2012)
  • Korean Art: Narratives and Displays in Museum Contexts - Joint Centre for Korean Studies (SOAS) / British Museum Symposium on Korean Arts and Culture, co-organiser (2012)

Recent publications

S. Priewe, (with Quanyu Wang and Susan LaNiece) “A technical study of inlaid Eastern Zhou bronzes in the British Museum on a unique figure of a leaping feline.” ISIJ International 54:5 (2014), pp. 1131-38.

S. Priewe, (with Quanyu Wang) “A technical study of the double-ram zun ancient Chinese bronze vessel in the British Museum.” In Chen Kwang-tzuu (ed.), 金玉交辉——商周考古、艺术与文化论文集 (Radiance between Bronze and Jade – Archaeology, Art, and Culture of the Shang and Zhou Dynasties), Taipei: Institute of History and Philology, Academia Sinica, 2013, pp. 257-283.

S. Priewe, (with Quanyu Wang) “Scientific analysis of a Buddha attributed to the Yongle period of the Ming dynasty, China.” British Museum Technical Research Bulletin 7 (2013), pp. 61-68.

S. Priewe, “相互联结的聚落:北齐、北周与隋朝时期中国中北部地区的粟特人及其下葬方式 (Networked communities: Sogdians and their burials in north-central China during the Northern Qi, Northern Zhou and Sui periods).” [in Chinese] In Wu Hung, Zhu Qingsheng and Zheng Yan (eds.), 古代墓葬美术研究 第二辑 (Studies on Ancient Tomb Art vol. 2), Changsha: Hunan Meishu Chubanshe, 2013, pp. 215-231.

S. Priewe,“No. 13 Korean moon jar – London: A World City in 20 Objects.” Evening Standard, 20 December 2012, p. 47.

S. Priewe, “ ‘Ritual and Revelry: The Art of Drinking in Asia’: An Exhibition at the British Museum.” Orientations (September 2012), pp. 92-97.

S. Priewe, with Q. Wang, K. Chen and S. La Niece, A Chinese bronze gui vessel: genuine Western Zhou object or fake?, The British Museum Technical Research Bulletin 5 (2011), pp. 59-66.

S. Priewe, Hahn Kwang-ho and the British Museum, Orientations (November/December 2010), pp. 59-64.

S. Priewe, Das Zhangdefu-Sargbett: Grundlegende Fragen erneut gestellt (The Zhangdefu Funerary Bed: Raising Basic Questions Anew), Ostasiatische Zeitschrift 17 (Spring 2009), pp. 15-24.