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To celebrate Vikings Live, we have replaced our Roman alphabet with the runic alphabet used by the Vikings, the Scandinavian ‘Younger Futhark’. The ‘Younger Futhark’ has only 16 letters, so we have used some of the runic letters more than once or combined two runes for one Roman letter.

For an excellent introduction to runes, we recommend Martin Findell’s book published by British Museum Press.

More information about how we have ‘runified’ this site

 

Michael Willis

Curator
South Asia

Department: Asia 



Contact

+44 (0)20 7323 8844
mwillis@britishmuseum.org

Dr Michael Willis has curatorial charge of the early south Asian and Himalayan collections from the late centuries BCE to the circa fourteenth century CE. He conducts research on these collections and makes them available through publication, display and study-access. His special interests include Sanskrit, Tibetan and the history of south Asian religions.

Michael received his PhD from the University of Chicago and joined the British Museum in 1994. He has been a visiting professor at the Collège de France, the University of Groningen and the School of Oriental and African Studies (University of London).

Current projects

  • The Indian Temple: Production, Place and Patronage
    Collaboration with the Department of History at SOAS and the Welsh School of Architecture, Cardiff, is funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) for three years. The project examines how Indian temples where built and patronized and what their social and economic role was in medieval India.

Previous projects

External fellowships/ honorary positions/ membership of professional bodies

  • Fellow and Member of Council, Royal Asiatic Society. London

  • Monographs Editor, Society for South Asian Studies, The British Academy, London

Recent publications

M. Willis, Buddhist Reliquaries from Ancient India (London: British Museum, 2000)

M. Willis, Tibet: Life, Myth and Art (London, DBP, 1999)

M. Willis, Temples of Gopaksetra: A Regional History of Architecture and Sculpture in Central India, circa 600-950 (London: British Museum, 1997)

M. Willis, Inscriptions of Gopaksetra: Materials for the History of Central India (London, British Museum, 1996)

M. Willis, ‘Later Gupta History: Inscriptions, Coins and Historical Ideology’, Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society, 15 (2005) pp. 131-50