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To celebrate Vikings Live, we have replaced our Roman alphabet with the runic alphabet used by the Vikings, the Scandinavian ‘Younger Futhark’. The ‘Younger Futhark’ has only 16 letters, so we have used some of the runic letters more than once or combined two runes for one Roman letter.

For an excellent introduction to runes, we recommend Martin Findell’s book published by British Museum Press.

More information about how we have ‘runified’ this site

 

Local pARTnerships

Artistic engagement with the Museum

In partnership with

Since 2007, the British Museum and the Mary Ward Centre have been collaborating to support local people to access adult learning opportunities and the Museum’s collections.

Participants join creative arts sessions at the British Museum and in community venues that are focused upon exhibitions, developing a range of practical skills from single disciplines such as printmaking or silk painting to mixed media arts where a number of different creative techniques are employed. The results are regularly displayed at the Museum and local community events where participants introduce the public to their work.

For further information please contact communities@britishmuseum.org

Local pARTnerships

Community members taking part in a creative session.


Community art works

Nouka

Nouka, 2007
The Boat

This project involved more than 50 women who learnt techniques around weaving, collage, embellishment, print making, patchwork and overall colour. The different groups worked together using mixed media techniques to create a traditional Bangladeshi fishing boat.

Bangla Ghor

Bangla Ghor, 2008
A Bangladeshi House

The participants involved in constructing this Bangla Ghor experienced the whole design process starting with brainstorming ideas, sharing memories and stories, visits to the Museum for inspiration, developing designs and making the final panels.

Sonar Bangla

Sonar Bangla, 2004
The Golden Bengal

Community groups across Camden worked on this project. The aim was to take the participants on a journey through Golden Bangladesh exploring the themes of transport, agriculture, factories, landscape, rivers, sea, life, food and the people of Bangladesh.

Nakshi Pati

Nakshi Pati, 2010
Traditional Bangladeshi mat

Mats have been in use since ancient times and were used abundantly before the introduction of modern furniture in Bengali homes. This project involved creating a decorative mat as a beautiful piece of art work incorporating imagery and materials associated with Bangladesh.

Mahmal

Mahmal, 2011
 

Inspired by Hajj: journey to the heart of Islam, this project aimed to capture the magic of the Mahmal. The participants used some of the historical techniques employed in some of the original Mahmal, whilst incorporating elements of the contemporary design and technique.